Revenue Sharing and the City

By Walter W. Heller; Richard Ruggles et al. | Go to book overview

REBUTTAL COMMENTS
Walter W. HellerAnyone who advances a proposal that gets labeled with his own name is assumed to have a vested-- and perhaps even irrational--interest in that proposal. I plead guilty, but perhaps not to the misdemeanor you may have in mind. For my vested interest is not in the specific ins and outs of a particular plan, but in two broad objectives:
--first, to focus national interest and concern on the revitalization of our state-local governments as an essential step toward a stronger federalism;
--second, and closely interrelated, to find ways and means of sharing federal revenue bounties with state and local governments that will loosen their fiscal fetters and help them exercise and strengthen their muscles--and do so in ways that will increase the progressivity of our public revenue-expenditure system.

The first aim is already well on the way to accomplishment. There's a pretty brisk national dialogue under way, and the conference which produced these papers is part of it.

To accomplish the second aim, I like income tax sharing for reasons that to my mind are persuasive and have yet to be effectively refuted. But let me

-107-

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Revenue Sharing and the City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • I THE PAPERS 1
  • A SYMPATHETIC REAPPRAISAL OF REVENUE SHARING 3
  • THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND FEDERALISM 39
  • II THE DISCUSSION 73
  • REFLECTIONS ON THE CASE FOR THE HELLER PLAN 75
  • FEDERAL GRANTS TO CITIES, DIRECT AND INDIRECT 92
  • COMMENTS ON BLOCK GRANTS TO THE STATES 100
  • REBUTTAL COMMENTS 107
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