Alabama: The History of a Deep South State

By William Warren Rogers; Robert David Ward et al. | Go to book overview

ELEVEN
The Secession Crisis

N fall 1855 the continued violence in Kansas concerned Alabamians, as did the surprising successes of Republican party candidates in northeastern and midwestern congressional elections. When the Thirty- fourth Congress convened in December 1855, Republicans composed 45 percent of the House of Representatives. Sectionalism was aggravated when the House speakership contest took two months and 133 ballots before a Republican was elected. Fledgling Republicans hoped Kansas would explode while all eyes were on the fall presidential elections. In the summer, Alabama planter John Horry Dent wrote a Northern relative of his wife that under the present political conditions, the South surely must secede from "a Union with the North, or give up all pretensions to honour and self-respect." If Northerners doubted it, they "little understand the Southern Character. . . . No Sir, we will quit the Union so soon as you elect a Black Republican President, cost what it may in blood or treasure."1

By the end of the year, both the Whig party and the American party had lost favor with the people of Alabama. To voters, the Democratic party seemed the only viable alternative, but it was rife with factional divisions--including States' Rights Democrats, Union Democrats, and former Whigs. At an organizational meeting in Montgomery in January 1856, William L. Yancey adopted Dixon Lewis's recommendation that he work to control the Democratic party rather than agitate for a Southern party. Yancey now insisted that the protection of the South could only be assured through the national Democratic party. The state Democrats adopted Yancey's 1848 Alabama Platform, which denied popular sovereignty and insisted that the federal government had a constitutional obligation to protect slave property in the territories.

Before the Democratic party met to select a candidate, proslavery settlers were massacred in Kansas and the Sumner-Brooks attack occurred in the Senate chamber, both escalating the sectional crisis. When the convention opened in Cincinnati, many delegates considered incumbent Democratic president Franklin Pierce too weak to defeat the

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alabama: The History of a Deep South State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 742

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.