Alabama: The History of a Deep South State

By William Warren Rogers; Robert David Ward et al. | Go to book overview

THIRTY - FOUR
Gender, "Jocks," and Shakespeare: Alabama Society and Culture, 1970-1993

ALABAMA'S society and culture as the twentieth century came to a close reflected the glacial pace of economic and political change. The status of women demonstrated both the tenacious hold of tradition and the slow inroads of modernity. Only a handful of women served in the legislature before the late 1970s. After the 1976 elections, for the first time in history, two women served as state lawmakers at the same time. Three more joined them in 1978, including Louphenia Thomas of Birmingham, the first black woman legislator. The 1978 delegation also included two Mobile women who would serve ably into the 1990s.

Republican Ann Bedsole and Democrat Mary Stephen Zoghby won acclaim for their efforts on behalf of historic preservation and women's issues. Bedsole broke with Governor Hunt and many members of her party in the 1990s by opposing a stringent antiabortion law proposed by her colleagues. She also became the first Republican woman elected to both the house and the senate. Bedsole received some female company in February 1993 when Sandra Escott-Russell won a special election in Jefferson County and became the first black woman to take a seat in the upper chamber. Democrat Pat Davis from Birmingham proved that women could also exemplify the seamy side of Alabama politics when she was indicted and convicted of extorting bribes.

Women won political posts in cities throughout the state. Female mayors served Anniston, Auburn, and many smaller communities. In 1971 Nina Miglionico won reelection and Angie Proctor won a first term to the Birmingham city council, where they generally voted with two blacks in favor of progressive legislation. In 1975 the first black woman, Bessie Estelle, won a council seat.

These victories reflected a more profound change in Birmingham's leadership patterns. Women had always exercised influence within spheres traditionally reserved for them, but during these decades they broadened their circle of influence. A 1988 Birmingham Post-Herald survey to determine the city's leading women discovered some interesting patterns. Many were wives and mothers who had begun their

-607-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alabama: The History of a Deep South State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 742

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.