Alabama: The History of a Deep South State

By William Warren Rogers; Robert David Ward et al. | Go to book overview

Alabama: Past and Future

IN 1835 the Cherokm--the last of the native Americans in Alabama-- set out for the western reservations along their "Trail of Tears." On the old Cherokee and other tribal lands live the descendants of the white settlers and the black slaves who, in coercive alliance, built the burgeoning cotton economy of antebellum Alabama.

This history has chronicled the journey through time of these whites and blacks. Constant hope and expectation were sometimes waylaid by false leaders who called for changes in the route and by those who extracted exorbitant tolls for every painful mile of travel. And there were always those of truer vision to remind the errant and recall the travelers to a happier future. What do the historical mileposts and the maps reveal?

The Alabama progression may be viewed from two vantage points. From far above only the toiling column can be observed; only the twists and turns of collective action and group policy come into focus. From this stance the little groups that surge ahead and scout the flanks and search for new directions are lost to view. There were two separate routes to the present, and two very different pictures emerge.

Alabama did not begin its life with a clean slate. The settlers brought their customs and their earlier experience, their concepts of law, society, and religion into a huge domain where distance and dispersion quickly modified values. Survival on a raw frontier often looked more like the violent world of Thomas Hobbes than the more mannered inconveniences of John Locke.

It is interesting--if ultimately futile--to speculate on the possibilities for Alabama if the cotton textile industry in England and then New England had not developed when it did. Would Alabama's economy and therefore much of its culture have more closely mirrored the cohesiveness and tighter social control of New England and the Middle States? Most probably not, although an entire state of small farmers would have produced a different future. In fact, more than half the state barely shared in the cotton/slave revolution, and those small farmer areas

-623-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alabama: The History of a Deep South State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 742

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.