Alabama: The History of a Deep South State

By William Warren Rogers; Robert David Ward et al. | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
Counties of Alabama

In Order of Organization
CountyDate of
Organization
Origin of the NameCounty Seat
Washington June 4, 1800 President George Washington Chatom
Madison Dec. 13, 1808 President James Madison Huntsville
Baldwin Dec. 21, 1809 Senator Abraham Baldwin of
Georgia
Bay Minette
Clarke Dec. 10, 1812 General John Clarke of
Georgia
Grove Hill
Mobile Dec. 18, 1812 Maubila Indians Mobile
Monroe June 29, 1815 President James Monroe Monroeville
Montgomery Dec. 6, 1816 Major Lemuel P.
Montgomery of Tennessee
Montgomery
Franklin Feb. 6, 1818 Benjamin Franklin Russellville
Lauderdale Feb. 6, 1818 Colonel James Lauderdale of
Tennessee
Florence
Lawrence Feb. 6, 1818 Captain James Lawrence of
U. S. Navy
Moulton
Limestone Feb. 6, 1818 Limestone Creek Athens
Marengo Feb. 6, 1818 Napoleonic battle in Europe Linden
Morgan Feb. 6, 1818 General Daniel Morgan of
Virginia
Decatur
Blount Feb. 6, 1818 Governor Willie Blount of
Tennessee
Oneonta
Tuscaloosa Feb. 6, 1818 Chief Tuscaloosa (Tascaluza) Tuscaloosa
Bibb Feb. 7, 1818 Governor William Wyatt Bibb Centreville
Shelby Feb. 7, 1818 Governor Isaac Shelby of
Kentucky
Columbiana
Dallas Feb. 9, 1818 A. J. Dallas, U.S. Secretary of
the Treasury
Selma
Conecuh Feb. 13, 1818 An Indian word, Conecuh
River
Evergreen
Marion Feb. 13, 1818 General Francis Marion of
South Carolina
Hamilton
St. Clair Nov. 20, 1818 General Arthur St. Clair of
Pennsylvania
Ashville
Autauga Nov. 21, 1818 Indian village of Atagi Prattville
Butler Dec. 13, 1819 Captain William Butler of
Creek Wars
Greenville

-635-

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