Alabama: The History of a Deep South State

By William Warren Rogers; Robert David Ward et al. | Go to book overview

Bibliography
Books, articles, and theses and dissertations are the only works cited in the bibliography, which is divided into three parts to conform with the book's time divisions. The materials are arranged in this manner to make sources easier to find, particularly for students. Primary materials--published and unpublished federal, state, county, and local government documents, newspapers, manuscripts, and similar sources--are cited only in Part III for a period with fewer secondary sources. Nor was it possible or considered desirable to attempt an exhaustive accounting of secondary sources. Specific quotations are listed in the notes at the end of the chapters. Alabama is fortunate in having a wide variety of historical materials on deposit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery; the libraries at the University of Alabama and Auburn University are important research centers; holdings at Tuskegee University are a rich source for black history. Other colleges and universities, state and private, also have research data relevant to the state.Special mention should be made of the outstanding collections at the Birmingham Public Library. The Mobile Public Library has historical sources for south Alabama that are not available elsewhere. Regional libraries and archives and the Library of Congress and the National Archives in Washington, D.C., have much valuable material on Alabama.
Part I. From Early Times to the End of the Civil War: Chapters 1-13

BOOKS
Abernethy Thomas Perkins . The Formative period in Alabama, 1815-1828. University: University of Alabama Press, 1965.
Adair James . The History of the American Indians. 1775. Reprint. New York: Johnson Reprint, 1968.
Amos [Doss], Harriet E. Cotton City: Urban Development in Antebellum Mobile. University: University of Alabama Press, 1985.
Armes Ethel . The Story of Coal and Iron in Alabama. 1910. Reprint. Birmingham: Book-keepers Press, 1972.

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