Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State

By Martin Sicker | Go to book overview

placed Meinertzhagen in an awkward position within Allenby's command and, as a consequence, his superiors routinely rejected many of his recommendations.

As a political officer, however, Meinertzhagen had a direct reporting channel to the Foreign Office, whereas his military superiors reported to the War Office. Outraged by British complicity in the Jerusalem riot, on April 14 Meinertzhagen undertook to communicate his views on the matter directly to Lord Curzon, who had replaced Balfour as foreign secretary, and who received his memorandum while at San Remo. He informed Curzon that he had received ample warning about the forthcoming riot and had advised both Allenby and Bols about it. Moreover, he had warned them that another official of the military administration, Waters-Taylor, had been surreptitiously encouraging Haj Amin al-Husseini and Aref al-Aref to stir up trouble. Neither Allenby nor Bols took any measures to prevent the outbreak. Meinertzhagen told Curzon: "The officers of the Administration are, almost without exception, anti-Zionist in their views. . . . I am convinced that if our British Administration were imbued with an understanding of and sympathy for Zionism which your Lordship has a right to expect, the risk of anti-Jewish riots might have been minimized, if not altogether avoided."35

Curzon and Lloyd George were sufficiently influenced by Meinertzhagen's memorandum to conclude that it was time to replace the military administration by a civil government under a high commissioner. The memorandum also ended Meinertzhagen's career on Allenby's staff.


NOTES
1
Alex Bein, The Return to the Soil, p. 180.
2
Jon Kimche, The Unromantics, p. 52.
3
Neil Caplan, Palestine Jewry and the Arab Question, 1917- 1925, pp. 26-27.
5
Kimche, The Unromantics, pp. 53-54.
7
John J. McTague, British Policy in Palestine, 1917- 1922, p. 50.
8
Douglas V. Duff, Sword for Hire, pp. 156-157.
9
McTague, British Policy in Palestine, p. 52.
11
Documents on British Foreign Policy, 1919- 1939, vol. IV, p. 345.
12
Joseph B. Schechtman, Rebel and Statesman: The Early Years, p. 295.

-24-

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Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - British Military Government, 1918-1920 1
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - The Jewish High Comissioner 27
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - Internal Developments During the Samuel Regime 53
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - The Passfield White Paper 73
  • Notes 92
  • 5 - Prelude to Open Conflict 93
  • Notes 115
  • 6 - The Arab Revolt, 1936-1939 117
  • Notes 149
  • 7 - Palestine During World War II 151
  • Notes 176
  • 8 - The United Resistance 179
  • Notes 201
  • 9 - The United Nations Special Committee 203
  • Notes 222
  • 10 - The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State 223
  • Notes 240
  • Selected Bibliography 243
  • Index 253
  • About the Author *
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