Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State

By Martin Sicker | Go to book overview

spot near the Tel Aviv zoo where each received eighteen lashes and was then released. The next morning, another Irgun warning was posted: "If the oppressors dare in the future to abuse the bodies and the human and national honour of Jewish youths, we shall no longer reply with the whip. We shall reply with fire." 23

The British attempt to humiliate the Jews had backfired. They were humiliated instead. The other Irgun prisoner was not whipped but granted amnesty instead, along with sixteen Arabs. Churchill, concerned about British prestige, accused the government of not knowing how to "behave like men. You whip a Jewish terrorist and the terrorists catch a British major and three non-commissioned officers and whip them the next day. You then cancel the whipping of another terrorist. Do you know what this means?" 24


NOTES
1
New York Times, March 18, 1944.
4
Manchester Guardian, April 24, 1944.
5
New York Herald-Tribune, February 4, 1945.
6
Michael J. Cohen, Palestine: Retreat from the Mandate, p. 160.
7
J. C. Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 228.
8
Palestine Post, September 28, 1945.
9
Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 232.
10
Palestine Post, November 29, 1945.
11
New York Times, January 26, 1946.
13
Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 256.
14
Thurston Clarke, By Blood and Fire, p. 108.
16
Harry Sacher, Israel. The Establishment of a State, pp. 62-63.
17
Palestine Post, July 24, 1946.
18
J. Bowyer Bell, Terror Out of Zion, p. 173.
19
Hurewitz, The Struggle for Palestine, p. 258.
20
Michael J. Cohen, "The Zionist Perspective", in William Roger Louis and Robert W. Stookey, eds., The End of the Palestine Mandate, p. 86.
21
New York Times, February 15, 1947.
22
Menachem Begin, The Revolt, p. 231.

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pangs of the Messiah: The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - British Military Government, 1918-1920 1
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - The Jewish High Comissioner 27
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - Internal Developments During the Samuel Regime 53
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - The Passfield White Paper 73
  • Notes 92
  • 5 - Prelude to Open Conflict 93
  • Notes 115
  • 6 - The Arab Revolt, 1936-1939 117
  • Notes 149
  • 7 - Palestine During World War II 151
  • Notes 176
  • 8 - The United Resistance 179
  • Notes 201
  • 9 - The United Nations Special Committee 203
  • Notes 222
  • 10 - The Troubled Birth of the Jewish State 223
  • Notes 240
  • Selected Bibliography 243
  • Index 253
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.