Iron Admirals: Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century

By Ronald Andidora | Go to book overview

3
The Man Who Could Lose the Empire in an Afternoon

I

On June 28, 1914, in the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, a disgruntled Serbian nationalist joined the ranks of those little men whose desperate acts give them claim to a disproportionate historical impact. Gavrilo Princip's two bullets not only ended the lives of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife but also set off a conflagration that would consume three Imperial Dynasties and transform the world's political and social orders. As heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, Franz Ferdinand had been viewed with a jaundiced eye by the notables of Vienna. He was too receptive to the aspirations of the Empire's subject nationalities and his wife's manners too clearly reflected her low social standing. Now, the deceased couple provided a pretext to crush Serbia and eliminate a major source of nationalistic agitation. But Russia's czar viewed himself as protector of southern Slavic peoples and intervened on Serbia's behalf. The German kaiser, whose nation was bound to Austria by alliance since 1879, backed Vienna to the hilt. This brought in France, which was pledged to support Russia when the latter was opposed by more than one other great power. Thus, Europe willingly marched into the conflict that would dissipate its wealth and manpower to such an extent that it would never recover its position of unassailable world predominance.

It was not a foregone conclusion that Great Britain would throw herself on the funeral pyre that was lit at Sarajevo. Unlike the other principals, England was not bound by any formal alliance that compelled her to participate

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Iron Admirals: Naval Leadership in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Nelson's Legacy 1
  • 2 - Samurai in Nelson's Shadow 11
  • 3 - The Man Who Could Lose the Empire in an Afternoon 45
  • 4 - The Fighter and the Strategist 91
  • 5 - The New Legacies 149
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 175
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 181

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.