A Reference Companion to the History of Abnormal Psychology - Vol. 1

By John G. Howells; M. Livia Osborn | Go to book overview

H

HAAKON THE GOOD (914-961). A ruler of Norway. He serves as an early example of reactive depression mistaken for insanity. He was banished to Denmark; there, he brooded until he became deeply depressed and was believed to be insane. He recovered after a few months when his hopes rose again.

Bibliography: Retterstøl N. 1975. Scandinavia. In World history of psychiatry, ed. J. G. Howells.

HABERLIN, PAUL (1878-1960). A well-known Swiss philosopher. He was interested in children with behavior problems and dedicated himself to their education, allowing two to three of these children to live in his own home. Although he met Carl Jung (q.v.) and Sigmund Freud (q.v.), he remained critical of psychoanalysis (q.v.) and accepted only some elements of it. He believed that anxiety stemmed from guilt and depression from arrogance toward life. He wrote on many subjects, including the psychology (q.v.) of marriage, characterology, and education.

Bibliography: Ellenberger H. F. 1970. The discovery of the unconscious.

HACKET, WILLIAM (?-1591). An English fanatic. Believing himself to be a prophet of God and king of Europe, he persuaded two other individuals to propagate these ideas in a kind of folie à trois. When he was arrested and tried for treason, his behavior induced the judges to think that he was assuming madness to escape justice. Hacket was hanged, although popular opinion held that he was insane. One of his accomplices starved himself to death in Bridewell (q.v.) prison, and the other lived to repent his actions. An account of the trial was written by Richard Cosin (q.v.).

Bibliography: Hunter R. and Macalpine I. 1963. Three hundred years of psychiatry.

HADFIELD, JAMES (c. 1771-1849). An English war veteran. While serving in Flanders, he received severe head injuries, which were believed to have

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A Reference Companion to the History of Abnormal Psychology - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Journal Abbreviations xv
  • A 3
  • B 63
  • C 147
  • D 225
  • E 276
  • F 308
  • G 349
  • H 393
  • I 456
  • J 475
  • K 496
  • L 522
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