Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America

By Glenn Loney | Go to book overview

Othello not only in this country but also in Drury Lane when he returned to London after 1774.

With the appearance of these new actors, the audiences must have seen a difference in the style of acting. Was it an instance of "the old order changeth?" Was it possible that these new actors from England would affect and effect a complete change in the style of acting? Would the actor trained in the Quin school or the Garrick school change his style? What about the actor who had been born in the colonies? Would he or she bring to the stage something new in the style of acting? Or would there be developed an eclectic style--a fusion of the best from Quin, Garrick, the colonies? In this country it was time for change, a time of change, time for a fusion.


The Epilogue

In 1774 the Continental Congress passed a resolution to suspend theatrical presentations. This act brought about a fusion. But it was a fusion of another sort; it was a style of acting known as "a revolutionary experience."


Notes
1.
Quoted in Hugh F. Rankin, The Theatre in Colonial America ( Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1960), p. 6.
2.
Lily B. Campbell, "The Rise of a Theory of Stage Presentation in England during the 18th Century," Publication of the Modern Language Association 32 ( June 1917): 163-200.
3.
Quoted in Joseph Knight, David Garrick ( London: 1894), pp. 62-63.
4.
Quoted in Edwin Duerr, The Length and Depth of Acting ( New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1962), pp. 220-21.
5.
Quoted in Toby Cole and Helen Krich Chinoy, eds., Actors on Acting ( New York: Crown, 1949), pp. 94-95.
6.
Campbell, "Rise of a Theory," p. 179.
7.
Quoted in Duerr, Length and Depth, p. 222.
8.
William Cooke, Memoirs of Charles Macklin, Comedian ( 1804; reprint, New York: Benjamin Blom, 1972), p. 13.
9.
Charles Macklin, "The Art and Duty of the Actor," quoted in Cole and Chinoy, Actors on Acting, pp. 131-32.
10.
Alexander Pope, quoted in Cole and Chinoy, Actors on Acting, p. 120.
11.
Ibid., p. 131.
12.
Ibid., p. 132.
13.
Duerr, Length and Depth, pp. 225-26.
14.
James Boaden, ed., The Private Correspondence of David Garrick with the Most Celebrated Persons of His Time, 2 vols. ( London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1831), 1: 177-78.
15.
Quoted in Rankin, Theatre in Colonial America, p. 56.
16.
Ibid., p. 132.

-65-

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