Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America

By Glenn Loney | Go to book overview

The Federal Theatre Project's Musical Productions

CAROL G. BAXTER

The Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Works Progress Administration (WPA) program created by the government during the depression to employ out-of-work theatre personnel, was established on 29 August 1935 and, just short of four years later, was abolished by Congress on 30 June 1939. In the month allotted to liquidate the project, units across the country sent their materials--scripts, set designs, lighting plots, ground plans, costume designs, posters, programs, playbills, photographs, musical scores, reviews, and production notebooks or bulletins--back to Washington for deposit in the National Archives and the Library of Congress.

In 1949 a National Archives staff archivist wrote a report on the WPA materials stored at the Library of Congress which concluded, "now, ten years after the termination of the Federal Theatre Project, it seems highly unlikely that there will be any sudden increase in reference inquiries involving the use of its records. With space becoming a serious problem . . . and with economy now a major objective . . . I am recommending that the majority of Federal Theatre Project records be destroyed." 1

For once, government inefficiency was a blessing. In 1974 the FTP materials sentenced to destruction years before were recovered at a Library of Congress storage facility near Baltimore by two English professors at George Mason University, Lorraine Brown and John O'Connor. The Library of Congress decided to place the 900 cubic feet of materials--about a quarter of a million items--on permanent loan to George Mason University, located in Fairfax, Virginia. The university received a $156,000 National Endowment for the Humanities grant to organize the collection; that task has been completed and the materials are accessible to researchers. The grant also included funds to establish an oral history program, and over 250 interviews with former FTP personnel have been conducted. The university is striving to create a "Living Archive" by offering courses, sponsoring forums and conferences, and creating institutes on the 1930s and on the relationships between government, society, and the arts. In 1978, a

-381-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 444

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.