Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America

By Glenn Loney | Go to book overview

PRESERVING THE HERITAGE: THE LIVING RECORD

Richard M. Buck, Moderator

Paulette Attie, Jerry Bell, Gerald Bordman, Michael Price, Panelists

Richard M. Buck, as its coordinator and chairman, introduced this panel. Two of its members, he said, needed no introduction. These were historian and critic Gerald Bordman, author of the definitive American Musical Theatre. A Chronicle, and Michael Price, the producer who has helped guide both revivals and new American musicals from the historic Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam, Connecticut, to Broadway. Paulette Attie, artistic director of the National Musical Theatre, was presented, and Jerry Bell was introduced as artistic director of the Bandwagon Company, whose production of the Florodora revival in New York was shown at the conference on videotape.

Gerald Bordman, in addition to his dedication to the American musical as a historian and a perceptive analyst, has an interest in revivals of good but forgotten musicals. His work with the New Princess Theatre Company in furthering this goal was noted. Bordman deplored the apparent lack of a tradition of the American musical: not that there isn't a tradition at all, but rather, that many people seem to think that there was no musical before Oklahoma! worth reviving, with the possible exceptions of Show Boat and Pal Joey.

Paying tribute to Michael Price's bravery in reviving shows of the past at the Goodspeed, Bordman at the same time objected to what he saw as the practice of updating or changing the original show books, and adding songs which were not in the original scores. He admitted that some older musicals seem old-fashioned, but, he said, so are gingerbread houses, Charles Dickens, and Mozart symphonies. Bordman therefore pleaded for respect for the old shows, for "very faithful, very tasteful revivals."

Jerry Bell echoed Bordman's sentiments, suggesting that the

-407-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 444

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.