Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America

By Glenn Loney | Go to book overview

SUMMING IT UP

Gerald Bordman

I really don't know what the point is of summarizing a conference which we've all just sat through and enjoyed so much. Won't it be rather like trying to gild the lily? It's been a very interesting experience for me, and I'm sure for you.

It may sound strange for me to say this, being a scholar of the American musical theatre, but I don't go to the American musical theatre anymore. I don't like what I see or hear, so it's a pleasure to draw the conclusion that the American musical theatre is alive and well in academia, if not on Broadway.

Hasn't it been delightful to spend all this time together and not be assaulted, as we would be at so many modern musicals, by foul language, frontal nudity, and left-wing propaganda? Of course, we weren't totally spared it. One speaker did complain about management exploitation of chorus girls in the nineteenth century. I would like to have pointed out to her that if any of those chorus girls were particularly beautiful and talented, and were blessed with that special charisma that eventually made her a star, she was almost certain to exploit the management in turn. There are two sides to every coin.

It would be impossible for me to touch on every paper, so I'll merely spend a few brief moments on highlights of special interest to me. I was most intrigued with the work done on eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century musicals. It's a field that needs so much work, and I'm glad to see that such work is being done by good hands. I suspect when I come to revise my first book, American Musical Theatre: A Chronicle, the section covering musicals before 1866 will need substantial rewriting.

I was intrigued with the discussions on minstrel shows--and

-413-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Musical Theatre in America: Papers and Proceedings of the Conference on the Musical Theatre in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 444

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.