Citizens, Political Communication, and Interest Groups: Environmental Organizations in Canada and the United States

By John C. Pierce; Mary Ann E. Steger et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book represents a collective effort among the four authors, certainly, but it was a collaboration supported by a much wider array of persons and organizations. First, appreciation must be expressed for the generosity of the Canadian government, provided in the form of a grant from the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C., under their faculty research grant program. Resources from this grant partially supported the collection of the survey data reported here.

Additional support for the research field work and subsequent analysis of findings was provided by the several universities involved--Washington State University, Oakland University, Northern Arizona University, and Oregon State University. The authors benefited both from general university resources and from the useful suggestions and constructive criticisms of colleagues. In addition, a number of students also were critical to the success of one or another aspect of the work reported here, with special thanks being owed in this regard to Blair Stieber, Barbara Reskin, Lynette Lee-Sammons, and Craig Curtis.

In the preparation of the book manuscript, the enduring thanks of the authors are due to three exceptional individuals--Ruth Self, Linda Moore, and Carolyn Hood--whose patience, diligence, and problem- solving skills were indispensable to the book's completion. From the earliest drafts of field instruments to the final production of camera- ready figures and tables, their good cheer and remarkable abilities made the work pleasurable and satisfying.

While many persons and organizations shared in the tasks of collecting information and analyzing that information for some appropriate insights, the authors alone bear the responsibility for what is said here.

-xvii-

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Citizens, Political Communication, and Interest Groups: Environmental Organizations in Canada and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure and Tables ix
  • Series Foreword xiii
  • Notes xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter One - Information, Individuals, and Interest Groups 1
  • Conclusion 31
  • Chapter Two - the Political Culture Context 33
  • Notes 64
  • Chapter Three - Trust in Sources of Policy-Relevant Information 69
  • Notes 94
  • Chapter Four - the Information Incentive 95
  • Notes 120
  • Chapter Five - Organizational Resources and Informational Capacity 123
  • Notes 147
  • Chapter Six - Environmental Groups as Communicators 151
  • Note 170
  • Chapter Seven - Interest Groups, Individuals, and the Technical Information Quandary 171
  • Conclusion 186
  • Appendix Survey Questionnaires 191
  • References 211
  • Index 223
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS 227
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