Segregation in Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing in the United States

By Modibo Coulibaly; Rodney D. Green et al. | Go to book overview

own helplessness in the face of forces that do not appear amenable . . . even to collective political mechanisms of control." 68

A surprising limitation of Gordon's work, however, is his meager discussion of race and ethnicity. Although he often refers to "ethnic segregation" and to a reserve "army of the unemployed-jobless workers available for immediate employment" whose existence would "help discipline those inside the factory gates," he does not examine the racial makeup of this reserve army of labor or discuss the implications for residential settlement of a racially divided workforce. (Some efforts in this direction are contained in Green's 1984 study of antebellum Richmond, Virginia.) 69 Meanwhile, Robert Weaver observed in 1950 that

The color line in employment was well entrenched in the United States by 1929. The whole economic, political and social structure of the South dictated and supported it. In the North, long experience with importation of Negro strikebreakers had created anti-Negro sentiment on the part of the white workers. Institutionalized racial segregation in the South and spatial segregation in the North supported these attitudes. In all parts of the nation, the black worker had become a symbol of a potential threat to the white worker. This fear had grown out of the American worker's experience with an economy which has seldom had enough jobs to absorb the labor supply. 70


SUMMARY OF THE POST-CIVIL RIGHTS LITERATURE

After World War II, despite a growing theoretical and empirical challenge, mainstream explanations of urban residential segregation continued to be based on psychological factors. For some neoclassical economists, race relations, like any other commodity, are determined by individual tastes and invisible market forces. For others, the visibility of racial minorities and whites' fears of status loss were at the root of racial residential segregation; improving the economic conditions of racial minorities (particularly blacks) without eliminating these race-connected barriers to integration could, in Taueber's view, increase segregation.

For David Gordon, urban residential segregation, at least in its economic dimension, can best be understood and analyzed in the context of capitalism and capital accumulation; qualitative changes in the method of capital accumulation lead to qualitative changes in the pattern of urban spatial settlement. In the commercial city, the small scale of economic operations allowed residential settlement patterns to be essentially random. As the scale of production and capital accumulation increased in industrial and corporate cities, qualitatively different patterns of residential segregation based on economic status of various groups emerged. Like those of the urban ecologists, Gordon's model of segregation arrays residential neighborhoods in concentric zones around the central business district with distance of each neighborhood from the center related to the income of its residents. Unlike the urban ecologists, Gordon takes some account of the deeper economic patterns driving these income distributions.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Segregation in Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 3
  • 2 - Housing, History, and Schools of Thought 5
  • Summary of the Post-Civil Rights Literature 17
  • Notes 18
  • 3 - Development of Low-Income Housing in the United States 23
  • Summary 35
  • Notes 36
  • 4 - Research Procedure 43
  • Summary 58
  • Notes 59
  • 5 - Patterns of Segregation in Low-Income Housing, 1932-1963 63
  • Conclusion About the PWA 69
  • Conclusions About the USHA 80
  • Conclusions About War Housing 86
  • Summary: Patterns of Segregation in the Early Period 92
  • Notes 94
  • 6 - Patterns of Racial Segregation and Economic Isolation, 1964-1992 101
  • Summary 117
  • Notes 119
  • 7 - Trends in Subsidized Housing Segregation 123
  • Summary 129
  • Notes 130
  • 8 - Summary and Conclusion 131
  • Appendix 135
  • Note 137
  • Selected Bibliography 139
  • Index 151
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS 155
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.