Policing a Socialist Society: The German Democratic Republic

By Nancy Travis Wolfe | Go to book overview

English language texts; there is, naturally, a plethora of source material on the GDR criminal justice system written in German, Russian, and other foreign languages. General notes regarding sources are given at the beginning of a discussion. An extremely useful source for current news about Germany (East and West) is the German Tribune (published by Friedrich Reinecke Verlag GmbH, Hamburg); this weekly publication prints English translations of articles appearing in German newspapers.

All translations from German are by the author, except for those in English-language books which had already been translated. The use of German words has been kept to a minimum, but given the German penchant for long words, it is necessary to use abbreviations in the book. The ones most frequently used are listed under "Abbreviations."


NOTES
1.
The paucity of printed material available has led the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences to solicit curricula and bibliographies for comparative courses; the immediate success of the publication, for which I submitted the section pertaining to the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany), prompted the ACJS to issue an additional volume that provided similar materials pertaining to other countries. Further evidence of a growing interest in comparative criminal justice can be seen in the large number of sessions and paper presentations in professional conferences. For example, at the annual conference of the American Society of Criminology during each of the past few years, more than a hundred papers pertaining to international systems have been presented.
2.
The People's Police are also referred to as the DVP or VoPo (a term often used in FRG literature). Members of the Ministry for State Security are often referred to as Stasi (an abbreviation of the term Staatssicherheitdienst, which means state security service (SSD). There were, of course, other agencies in the GDR responsible for preventing crime or apprehending violators, such as the Customs, Border Troops, and the National People's Army (under certain circumstances).
3.
I have lived in the GDR for nearly two years. In 1985 I stayed in the GDR for three months under a grant from the International Research and Exchanges Board to study the legal system, particularly the social courts. In the summer of 1986 I returned for five weeks to continue this study and to examine the institution of "social accusers" and "social defenders." From May to December 1987, I was in the GDR (with grants from the Fulbright-Hays Training Act and from the International Research and Exchanges Board) to make a study of lay judges similar to the research done in the FRG. In the summer of 1989, I returned for one month with a grant from the American Philosophical Society to investigate the policing system. Again under IREX I stayed in the GDR from January to July of 1990 to complete the manuscript for this book.
4.
Naturally, the nature of police work necessitated secrecy on certain points. For example, when an officer outlined the problems arising from the sudden transfer of billions of FRG currency into the GDR, he could not explain the specific measures to be taken to prevent theft.

-xvi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Policing a Socialist Society: The German Democratic Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xvi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 The German People's Police 23
  • Chapter 3 The Ministry for State Security 60
  • Chapter 4 The End of an Era 88
  • Part II 101
  • Chapter 5 The Gentle Revolution 103
  • Chapter 6 Slaying the Dragon 123
  • Chapter 7 Reorienting the People's Police 169
  • Chapter 8 The Dissolution of the GDR 211
  • References 229
  • Index 241
  • About the Author 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.