Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War

By Steven James Lambakis | Go to book overview

Peace, of course, cannot be "designed" and "built" according to some blueprint; for the art of politics cannot be practiced to such rigorous standards. It also is not true that peace is beyond our grasp; we do not have to accept our fate. In the pursuit of peace, then, there is a role for political action or statesmanship. To be sure, it is an inexact science; statesmen cannot take refuge in mathematical certainties. They must deal comprehensively with all of life's frictions and humanity's caprice. The theme of this work is: statesmanship that incorporates the necessary political and practical wisdom reflected in Churchill's activities has been, and can be, our earthly salvation.

I was a student at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. when the major share of the writing for this book was completed. I am grateful, therefore, to the university for its support and the individuals who provided some very welcome and important criticisms, especially Drs. James P. O'Leary, Christopher Kelly, and Joan Barth Urban. In addition, I would like to thank Dr. Colin Gray of the National Institute for Public Policy for his guidance and Dr. Larry Arnn and Matt Spalding of the Claremont Institute in Montclair, California for their helpful comments leading up to the final preparation of this book. I am, of course, solely responsible for any and all errors found in this work.

I would like to give special acknowledgement and thanks to Chelsea House Publishers for permission to reprint excerpts from Winston S. Churchill: His Complete Speeches, edited by Robert Rhodes James, and to Houghton Mifflin Company and Curtis Brown for permission to reprint portions of the final volume of Martin Gilbert's masterful biography, Winston S. Churchill: Never Despair.

I have dedicated this book to my father, James M. Lambakis, whose example in life and undying love for his family always will be my inspiration.

And for providing the necessary sustenance for my living and happiness, I am grateful for the love and moral support I receive without fail from my wife Tracie and my son Matthew.


NOTE
1.
See, for example, the explanation of Aristotle: If the goal is to understand politics, "must we not rather abide by the maxim that in matters of action the end is not to study and attain knowledge of the particular things to be done, but rather to do them? Surely, knowing about excellence or virtue is not enough: we must try to possess it and use it" (emphasis added). Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, trans. Martin Oswald ( Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1979), p. 295 or 1179b1-4.

-xii-

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Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 Some Elements of Churchill's Political Understanding 7
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter 3 the Grand Alliance: Grand Forces, Great Men, and a Grave New World 33
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter 4 Churchill at Fulton: the Precarious Peace 85
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter 5 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part I: Force and International Politics 109
  • Notes 125
  • Chapter 6 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part Ii: Negotiation and Persuasion 131
  • Chapter 7 Conclusion 163
  • Notes 172
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author 187
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