Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War

By Steven James Lambakis | Go to book overview

The Bolshevik platform meant increasing instability in the world. Churchill opposed recognition of Lenin's new regime and fought to almost the last (Russian) man to subvert it by force. In the interests of peace, and recognizing in 1920 that his form of opposition was no longer practical, Churchill worked to fashion an acceptable compromise with the Soviet Union. His attempts at reconciliation did not mean, however, that he had bowed down before the new Soviet tyranny.


NOTES
1.
Churchill, "Thoughts on the Royal Visit," Step By Step, p. 231.
2.
Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France and The Rights of Man by Thomas Paine ( Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, 1961), p. 19
3.
Winston S. Churchill, The Story of My Early Life: A Roving Commission ( New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1941), p. 113.
4.
See Churchill, "Education in Bangalore," The Story of My Early Life, pp. 109- 121.
5.
Winston S. Churchill, "Will There Be War In Europe--and When?" The Collected Essays of Sir Winston Churchill, vol. 1, Churchill and War, ed. Michael Wolff , ( Bristol: Library of Imperial History, 1976), p. 436.
6.
Winston S. Churchill, Winston S. Churchill: His Complete Speeches, ed. Robert Rhodes James ( New York: Chelsea House Publishers in association with R.R. Bowker, 1974), p.7,647.
7.
See, for example, Churchill, Step By Step, pp. 55 and 57-59.
8.
Martin Gilbert, Winston Churchill: The Wilderness Years ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1982), p. 10.
9.
Martin Gilbert, Churchill's Political Philosophy ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1981), p. 3. See also pp. 12-13 and 23. See also Winston Churchill, "How To Stop War," Step By Step, p. 25, How to stop war "is the supreme question which should engage the thoughts of mankind. . . . [E]xcept for a few handfuls of ferocious romanticists, or sordid would-be profiteers, war spells nothing but toil, waste, sorrow and torment to the vast mass of ordinary folk in every land."
10.
Churchill, The Gathering Storm, p. 260. See also p. 201.
11.
See Raymond Aron, Peace and War: A Theory of International Relations, trans. Richard Howard and Annette Baker Fox ( Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, 1966), pp. 71-93.
12.
Churchill, The Gathering Storm, p. 260.
13.
Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics, pp.5-6. See also book 6, especially pp. 158-161.
14.
See, for example, Churchill, "Will There Be War in Europe--And When?" Churchill and War, p. 436.
15.
Words spoken by Churchill on January 7, 1939, on the eve of the long struggle with Nazi Germany, found on the title page of Gilbert, The Wilderness Years.
16.
Churchill, The Gathering Storm, p. 41.
17.
Quoted in Thomas Sowell, "Visions of War & Peace," Encounter ( December 1987), pp. 40-49.
18.
Churchill, "To End War," Churchill and War, vol. 1, p. 351.

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Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 Some Elements of Churchill's Political Understanding 7
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter 3 the Grand Alliance: Grand Forces, Great Men, and a Grave New World 33
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter 4 Churchill at Fulton: the Precarious Peace 85
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter 5 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part I: Force and International Politics 109
  • Notes 125
  • Chapter 6 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part Ii: Negotiation and Persuasion 131
  • Chapter 7 Conclusion 163
  • Notes 172
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author 187
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