Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War

By Steven James Lambakis | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Churchill's Postwar
Statesmanship
Part I: Force and
International Politics

In 1945 and 1946, Winston Churchill, no longer prime minister of Great Britain, continued nonetheless to focus on grand foreign policy questions. Despite his fall from power, or perhaps because of it, Churchill felt considerable apprehension for the future. He surveyed the devastation and the new political realities across the entire continent of Europe and understood that a much more difficult task awaited the statesmen of the western world. The great victory over the Axis powers was, in fact, only the beginning of a new collective effort to restore peace and security.

Four issues were of particular concern to Churchill during the immediate postwar period. First, no doubt first in priority too, as the Fulton speech emphasized, was the formation of a fraternal association with the United States. These special ties, strengthened by blood, heritage, and shared principles, and solidified by military and economic interests, were supposed to be the core of the collective western security alliance, an alliance intended to exercise vigilance before the growing threat from the East.

Second, a lasting peace demanded the nonaggressive association of all the leading powers which, in this new international order, would stand on equal terms with one another and behave toward one another in good faith and good- will. A settlement with the Soviet Union on the outstanding contentious issues was critical if there were to be true peace.

Third, Churchill understood that Britain's own prestige in the world hinged upon its ability to maintain the special relationship with the United States and Canada in the realm of defense and to work jointly with the only existing nuclear power on the manufacture of the atomic bomb. By withholding the secrets of the bomb from Moscow, the security interests of the West could be protected. A

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Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 Some Elements of Churchill's Political Understanding 7
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter 3 the Grand Alliance: Grand Forces, Great Men, and a Grave New World 33
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter 4 Churchill at Fulton: the Precarious Peace 85
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter 5 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part I: Force and International Politics 109
  • Notes 125
  • Chapter 6 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part Ii: Negotiation and Persuasion 131
  • Chapter 7 Conclusion 163
  • Notes 172
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author 187
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