Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War

By Steven James Lambakis | Go to book overview

By exerting themselves to prepare their defenses, to clash if necessary with the great land power in Eurasia, Churchill believed that, by a law of opposite effects, the world had a chance to become more unified. It does not follow, he stated, that "in a world divided there should not be equilibrium from which a further advance to unity might be attempted as the years pass by." 80 The difficulty of securing peace was never lost upon Churchill. As he explained in his work on Marlborough, his ancestor utilized a seemingly contradictory or paradoxical approach to find an answer to this eternal problem, an approach that Churchill too would use for the benefit of peace in a divided and war-tom world as we shall see in Chapter six.

We must admire the dual process to which the Allies were now committed of earnestly seeking peace while at the same time preparing for war on an ever greater scale. Nearly always Governments which seek peace flag in their war efforts, and Governments which make the most vigorous war preparations take little interest in peace. The two opposite moods consort with difficulty in the human mind yet it is only by the double and, as it might seem, contradictory exertion that a good result can usually be procured. 81


NOTES
1.
Churchill, Complete Speeches, p. 7,262.
2.
Churchill, Complete Speeches, p. 8,532.
3.
Gilbert, Never Despair, p. 281. Many of the citations in this chapter and the one to follow are culled from this final volume in Gilbert's eight-volume biography. Gilbert's work to compile what has become the definitive account of Churchill's life is the single most valuable source for Churchill scholars, replete as it is with page after page of citations from Churchill's speeches, works, private letters, and official documents, many of which remain unavailable for routine public examination to this day. Analysis of Churchill's activities is not the strong point of this massive biography. Gilbert remained faithful, however, to the theme of the work (begun by Churchill's son Randolph, who met an untimely death) that "[h]e shall be his own biographer."
4.
Gilbert, Never Despair, p. 281.
5.
Gilbert, Never Despair, p. 289.
6.
Churchill, Complete Speeches, p. 7,980.
7.
Gilbert, Never Despair, p. 326.
8.
See for example Gilbert, Never Despair, pp. 24, 26, 32, 45, 154, 194-195, 536, and 842.
9.
Gilbert, Churchill's Political Philosophy, pp. 59-60.
10.
Churchill, Complete Speeches, p. 8,459.
11.
Churchill, Complete Speeches, p. 8,460. Churchill spoke here on the benefits of having an arms export industry, one of which would be the ability to keep the nation's industries prepared for total mobilization in the event of war.
12.
See for example Gilbert, Never Despair, pp. 320, 477-478, 518, 530, 539- 540. Churchill also believed Britain, especially during the administration of the Labour Party between 1945 and 1951, had to maintain her defenses if Britain was to

-125-

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Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 Some Elements of Churchill's Political Understanding 7
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter 3 the Grand Alliance: Grand Forces, Great Men, and a Grave New World 33
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter 4 Churchill at Fulton: the Precarious Peace 85
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter 5 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part I: Force and International Politics 109
  • Notes 125
  • Chapter 6 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part Ii: Negotiation and Persuasion 131
  • Chapter 7 Conclusion 163
  • Notes 172
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author 187
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