Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War

By Steven James Lambakis | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part II: Negotiation and Persuasion

Those who know how to win are much more numerous than those who know how to make proper use of their victories.

-- Polybius

The plight of mankind is all the fault of the human mind being made in two lobes, only one of which does any thinking, so we are all right-handed or left-handed; whereas, if we were properly constructed, we should use our right and left hands with equal force and skill according to circumstances. As it is, those who can win a war well can rarely make a good peace, and those who could make a good peace never win.

-- Winston Churchill

The conclusion that one must draw from the preceding chapter is that no foreign policy can have validity if there is not adequate force behind it and a national willingness to make the necessary sacrifices. 1 Churchill understood that nothing would be so foolish in the quest for normal relations with Soviet Russia than for the western democracies to abandon their unity or their arms. Above all, there was always the possibility that war once again would rain down its misfortunes over the entire world. Unity, stability, strength, and a common purpose, the guarantors of safety, also were the preconditions, the "essential basis," for an understanding with the East. 2

Churchill's postwar diplomacy was inspired by the urgent need to avoid a third world struggle, which meant making sure the Allies did not repeat the same short-sighted mistakes that permitted Nazi imperialism and aggression, organizing forces and policies around this single purpose, and finding a profitable approach to better relations with the Soviet Union. Force was a necessary component. A measured military policy can provide "the means of gradually approaching the situation when relations between world Powers may express themselves

-131-

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Winston Churchill, Architect of Peace: A Study of Statesmanship and the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 Some Elements of Churchill's Political Understanding 7
  • Notes 26
  • Chapter 3 the Grand Alliance: Grand Forces, Great Men, and a Grave New World 33
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter 4 Churchill at Fulton: the Precarious Peace 85
  • Notes 104
  • Chapter 5 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part I: Force and International Politics 109
  • Notes 125
  • Chapter 6 Churchill's Postwar Statesmanship Part Ii: Negotiation and Persuasion 131
  • Chapter 7 Conclusion 163
  • Notes 172
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author 187
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