The Making of Energy and Telecommunications Policy

By Georgia A. Persons | Go to book overview

what it deemed were violations of the Sherman antitrust provisions and to force a restructuring of the Bell system. The DOJ pursued its course relentlessly; it, too, was largely undeterred by congressional action. A rather self-conscious Congress entered the policy fray belatedly and set out to seize the policy initiative by rewriting the 1934 Communications Act and preempting the efforts of the FCC and the DOJ. Although Congress had the advantage of statutory prerogative, in the end it was an institution without a clear, deliberate, and manageable goal. Prevailing policy initiative came from the DOJ with the January 1982 announcement of the proposed settlement of its antitrust case against AT&T.


NOTES
1
U.S. Congress. House. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. Subcommittee on Communications. The Communications Act of 1978: Hearings on H.R. 13015. 95th Cong., 2nd sess., 1978. Vol. II, pt. 1, p. 445. Testimony of J. Stephen Vanderwoude, Telecommunications Task Force of the Telephone Industry.
2
Ibid., Vol. II, pt. 2, pp. 82-83. Testimony of Honorable Charles Ferris, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission.
3
House. The Communications Act of 1978. Vol. I, pp. 499-507. Testimony of Richard A. Elkin, President, National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners.
4
Ibid. Vol. II, pt. 1, p. 301. Prepared statement of William M. Ellinghaus, Vice Chairman of the Board, AT&T.
5
Ibid., p. 263. Testimony of William M. Ellinghaus.
6
House. The Communications Act of 1978. Vol. II, pt. 1, p. 252. Testimony of William M. Ellilnghaus.
7
Ibid., pp. 409-414. Testimony of Philip M. Walker, Telenet Communications Corp.
8
House. The Communications Act of 1978. Vol. II, pt. 2, pp. 275-342. Testimonies and prepared statements of Orville Wright and Herbert N. Jasper, Ad Hoc Committee for Competition in Telecommunications.
9
Ibid., Vol. 1, p. 327. Testimony of Dean Burch, former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.
10
House. The Communications Act of 1978. Vol. II, pt. 1, p. 415. Testimony of William McGowan, Chairman of MCI.
11
Ibid., pp. 64-65. Testimony of Paul Henson, Chairman of United Telecommunications, Inc.
12
U.S. Congress. House. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. Subcommittee on Communications. Competition in the Telecommunications Industry: Hearings Exploring the Subject of Competition in the Domestic Communications Common Carrier Industry. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., 1976, pp. 733-950. Testimony and material submitted for the record by the Honorable Richard E. Wiley, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission.
13
House. The Communications Act of 1978. Vol. 1, pp. 520-527. Testimony of John M. Corman, National Rural Center.
14
Ibid., pp. 396-451. Testimony and material submitted for the record by Nicholas Johnson, National Citizens Communications Lobby.
15
House. The Communications Act of 1978. Vol. 1, pp. 633-642. Testimony

-132-

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