Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences

By Mario Carretero; James F. Voss | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I thank Patricia Avery, Margot Finn, Nancy Harper, Mary Mason, Carol McCullough, and Louisa Moffitt for their suggestions upon reading earlier drafts of this chapter, and special thanks to the four history teachers for sharing their insights on the teaching of controversial issues.


REFERENCES

Almond G., & Verba S. ( 1963). The civic culture. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Angell A. ( 1991). Democratic climates in elementary classrooms: A review of theory and research. Theory and Research in Social Education, 19, 241-266.

Barber B. R. ( 1989). Public talk and civic action: Education for participation in a strong democracy. Social Education, 53, 355-356.

Baughman J. E. ( 1975). An investigation of the impact of civics on political attitudes of adolescents. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park, MD.

Blankenship G. ( 1990). Classroom climate, global knowledge, global attitudes, political attitudes. Theory and Research in Social Education, 28, 363-386.

Bradley Commission on History in Schools. ( 1988). Building a history curriculum. Washington, DC: Education Excellence Network.

Brophy J. ( 1992). Fifth grade U.S. history: How one teacher arranged to focus on key ideas in depth. Theory and Research in Social Education, 20, 141-155.

Cuban L. ( 1991). History of teaching in social studies. In J. Shaver (Ed.), Handbook of research on social studies teaching and learning (pp. 197-209). New York: Macmillan.

Downey M., & Levstik L. ( 1988). Teaching and learning history: The research base. Social Education, 52, 336-342.

Downey M., & Levstik L. ( 1991). Teaching and learning history. In J. Shaver (Ed.), Handbook of research on social studies teaching and learning (pp. 400-410). New York: Macmillan.

Education Development Center. ( 1970). From subject to citizen. Chicago: Denoyer-Geppert.

Ehman L. H. ( 1969). An analysis of the relationships of selected educational variables with the political socialization of high school students. American Educational Research Journal, 6,559-580.

Ehman L. H. ( 1977, April). Social studies instructional factors causing change in high school students' socio-political attitudes over a two-year period. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York.

Engle S. H., & Ochoa A. S. ( 1988). Education for democratic citizenship: Decision-making in the social studies. New York: Teachers College Press.

Evans R. W. ( 1990). Teacher conceptions of history revisited: Ideology, curriculum, and student belief. Theory and Research in Social Education, 18(2), 101-138.

Giesse J. R. (in press). Studying and teaching history. In Teaching the social sciences and history in secondary schools. A methods book. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing.

Gilligan C. ( 1982). In a different voice: Psychological theory and women's development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Goodlad J. I. ( 1984). A place called school. Prospects for the future. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Griffin A. F. ( 1992). A philosophic approach to the subject matter preparation of teachers of history. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. (Reprinted by the National Council for the Social Studies, Washington, DC.) (Original work published in 1942)

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