Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

F

Faddle, Samuel, fatuous young friend of Tom Tringle] and fellow member of the Mountaineers Club. Faddle's foolish behaviour leads his father to banish him to Aberdeen: 'Our friend Tom saw nothing more of his faithful friend till years had rolled over both their heads' (XXXVI). AA WK

Fairlawn, Mr, master of the hounds of the Hitchin Hunt, who intrudes upon Mr Harkaway's coverts during the Cumberlow Green Hunt, an act of territorial violation which pits the members of each hunt against the other. MSF MT

Fairstairs, Charlotte (Charlie), young woman a little too long in the marriage market. Though neither young, attractive, nor having a particularly mild temper, Miss Fairstairs benefits mightily from the tuition of Arabella Greenow, and ultimately manages to persuade the wealthy Mr Cheesacre to marry her. CYFH JMR

Faithfull, Emily ( 1836-95), advocate of women's issues, particularly employment; lecturer and founder of the Victoria Press ( 1860). Her base of operations was Langham Place, which housed the Society for Promoting the Employment of Women, its activists being 'the Ladies of Langham Place'. Trollope associated with them sympathetically, but never budged from his stand on the best women's right being a husband. Emily Faithfull founded a printing company staffed by women. Trollope dubbed her 'that female Caxton of the Age' ( Letters 1, 220). He contributed without charge "'A Journey to Panama'" to her Victoria Regia ( 1861) and 'Miss Ophelia Gledd' to another of her publications, A Welcome ( 1863). RCT

Fane, Lady Rose Sophia Mary ( 1834-1921), second daughter of the 11th Earl of Westmorland, keenly interested in the arts. In 1866 she married the artist Henry Weigall, a member of the Athenaeum Club, to which Trollope also belonged. As guest of Lord Houghton at Fryston in January 1866, she met the Trollopes, and wrote of them to her mother with cordial disdain: 'I wish I had never seen Mr Trollope, I think he is detestable-- vulgar and noisy & domineering--a mixture of Dickens vulgarity & Mr Burtons self- sufficiency--as unlike his books as possible' ( Letters 1, 321). Of Rose Trollope she observed: 'a quiet sort of woman & wd. be well enough only she has perfectly white hair which is coiffé en cheveux [bareheaded]--in the most fashionable way with (last night) a little rose stuck in it wh: looks most absurd.' Letters 1, 321n. RCT

Faragon, Mme. A fierce, suspicious old woman with a romantic soul, she is a distant cousin of Michel Voss and proprietor of the Hôtel de la Poste in Colmar. GLG MG

Farmer, nursemaid to the Trollope family. One of Trollope's earliest memories was of himself aged 3 being helped by her to his 'minced mutton mixed with potatoes and gravy' ( Mullen16). Farmer made clothes and repaired shoes for the children, and when Trollope and Tom were at Winchester sent cake as an occasional treat. Her grimness and austerity produced a ditty: 'Old Farmer is an Anabaptist! | When she is gone, she will not be missed!' (quoted Mullen17). However, she remained a loyal retainer for many years. RCT

farmers as characters. One aspect of the perennial appeal of Trollope's novels is his concern with land, both as an enduring source of traditional values, and as a potent symbol of continuity. It is reflected in his interest in farmers and farming. His fiction shows that agriculture was still very much the basis of English life. The tenant farmer in Rachel Ray, Farmer Sturt, with his dialect and simple wisdom, and his wife with her utilitarian pariour, although marginal figures, contribute a detailed realism to the portrayal of a significant provincial community. In The Last Chronicle of Barset, Mary Crawley feels able to call on Farmer Mangle to spare her husband a long walk between Hogglestock and Barchester.

In his novels Trollope drew on his own experience of living close to the land as a boy, when he saw at first hand his father's disastrous venture in farming 160 acres (65 ha) of land leased at Harrow, an enterprise he combined with his work as

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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