Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

G

Gager, Mr, gifted young detective who investigates the theft of the Eustace diamonds. He marties Lizzie Eustace's maid Patience Crabstick, in part to secure her testimony at the trial of Mr Benjamin. ED JMR

Galway, assize town in Co. Galway, where the trial of Landleaguer Pat Carroll is to take place, and where Captain Yorke Clayton has his constabulary headquarters. L MRS

Gangoil, a 120,000-acre (50,000-ha) sheep ranch surrounded by thick forest, west of the Mary river in Queensland, which, rented from the Crown by Harry Heathcote, forms the parched setting for class animosities that explode in conflagration. HHG MRS

gardening. Having missed the rootedness of childhood Trollope set great store by normal domestic routines, especially the rituals of garden care. Rose was integral to this domestic pattern. During a visit to the United States in November 1861 he reported to Kate Field that Rose had gone home because 'She has a house, and children & cows & horses and dogs & pigs--and all the stern necessities of an English home' ( Letters 1, 161). This was Waltham House, which he always preferred to Montagu Square, since it had a large productive garden. 'Out of my little patches', he wrote, 'I have enough for all domestic purposes.' He then proudly listed 21 vegetables ( NA 1, XI). The asparagus bed and strawberries were favourites. The lawn was kept in good shape. George Smith once saw Trollope dashing around with a roller with typical energy. At the end of his life he wrote wistfully to Rose from Ireland, 'How is the garden [North End, Harting, their last home], and the cocks & hens, & especially the asparagus bed?' ( Letters 2, 966). RCT

Garnett family. After the death of John Garnett ( 1750-1820) his widow and three daughters, Julia, Harriet, and Fanny, moved amongst the intellectual circles in Paris where Frances Trollope became their friend. Julia married a Dr Pertz, royal librarian and archivist in Hanover. Mrs Trollope told her ( November 1831) of Anthony's winning a prize at Harrow. Her dearest wish, she said, was to see her sons in situations 'where their talents and good conduct might enable them to gain their bread' (quoted Super442). To Harriet she lamented ( December 1828) her husband's ungovernable temper and its dire effects on the children (quoted Mullen46). RCT

Garrow, Elizabeth (Bessy), independent- minded only daughter whose 'reverence for martyrdom' causes her to reject Godfrey Holmes initially. After his Christmas visit she comes round to accept him. "'Mistletoe'" TAC 2 GRH

Garrow, Theodosia ( 1825-65), poet and essayist; married Thomas Adolphus Trollope ( 1848). They settled in the Brownings' circle in Florence. Later there were rumours (said to have emanated from Robert Browning) about the paternity of the daughter Beatrice (Bice). After Theo's death Bice stayed with her uncle at Waltham Cross. For a while Frances Ternan (sister of Dickens's mistress) gave her singing lessons. RCT

Garrow family, headed by Major Garrow, a retired officer of Engineers, of modest means, and his warm-hearted wife. Concerned and careful parents, they are anxious about their daughter Bessy's matrimonial qualms, while her younger brothers Frank and Tom provide pranks, vitality, and laughter during Christmas. "'Mistletoe'" TAC 2 GRH

Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn ( 1810-65), author of socially realistic novels such as Mary Barton ( 1848), North and South ( 1855), and domestic subjects. She admired Trollope's work, but they never met. She wrote to George Smith, 'I wish Mr Trollope would go on writing Framley Parsonage for ever. I don't see any reason why it should ever come to an end, and everyone I know is always dreading the last number' ( The Letters of Mrs Gaskell, ed. J. A. V. Chapple and Arthur Pollard ( 1966), 602). RCT

Gatherum Castle, palatial castle near Silverbridge constructed by the old Duke of Omnium as his formal ducal seat. Despite its splendour, the castle is shunned both by the old Duke and by the young Duke and his family except during

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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