Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

H

habits, interests, opinions of Trollope. See CARD-PLAYING; DANCING; FOOD AND DRINK; GARDENING; HOLIDAYS ABROAD; HOUSE PARTIES; HUNTING; LIBRARY; LONDON: CLUBS; MUSIC- MAKING; SEA-BATHING; SMOKING; WINE.

Hadley, village in Essex, near London, where Mr George Bertram lives quietly, comfortably, and without ostentation. His home becomes the refuge of Lady Harcourt when she leaves her husband, and when Mr Bertram dies, it is left to his niece, Miss Baker. B MRS

Haggard, Sir Henry Rider ( 1856-1925), in 1875 secretary to the Governor of Natal, then with the Special Commissioner of the Transvaal in 1877, experiences which provided material for such novels as King Solomon's Mines ( 1886). Visiting South Africa in 1877, Trollope stayed at Pretoria overnight at Government House as guest of Sir Theophilus Shepstone. Rider Haggard was an aide. 'My first introduction to him [ Trollope] was amusing,' wrote Haggard in The Days of my Life: An Autobiography ( 1926). Entering the darkened room 'where I was then sleeping I began to search for matches, and was surprised to hear a gruff voice, proceeding from the bed, asking who the deuce I was. I gave my name and asked who the deuce the speaker might be. " Anthony Trollope," replied the gruff voice, " Anthony Trollope".' He thought Trollope was 'a man who concealed a kind heart under a somewhat rough manner, such as does not add to the comfort of colonial travelling' ( I & R214). RCT

Hale, Edward Everett ( 1822-1909), clergyman, short story writer; chaplain of US Senate ( 1903-9). In the 1860s, according to his son, Hale would read Trollope's novels aloud on summer evenings. He published The Way We Live Now in his periodical Old and New from January 1874 until it merged with Scribner's Magazine in June 1875. RCT

Hale, Susan ( 1833-1910), American watercolourist, writer, brother of Edward Everett Hale; part of the circle Trollope met during his visit to America in 1875. Susan Hale edited Sheets for the Cradle, a short-lived Boston publication, to which Trollope contributed 'Never, Never,-- Never, Never: A Condensed Novel, in Three Volumes, after the Manner of Bret Harte'. It appeared on 6, 8, and 10 December 1875. Each 'volume' consisted of three chapters of about 25 lines each. RCT

Hall, Abraham, courteous, concerned engineer and widower, kind to Sophie Wilson and Lucy Graham, to whom he declares his love with dignity and sensitivity. 'Telegraph' WFF GRH

Hall, Mrs Anna Maria ( 1800-81), author of two plays, nine novels, and several plays; editor of St James's Magazine ( 1862-3). She collaborated with her husband, author and editor Samuel Carter Hall , and helped found Brompton Consumption Hospital and other benevolent institutions. In 1861 Mrs Hall approached Trollope to join St James's, but Trollope refused. His lecture 'The National Gallery' appeared in the magazine in September 1861. Trollope declined to sign a testimonial commemorating the Halls' golden wedding anniversary, thus indicating that he was among those, like Dickens, who thought S. C. Hall a humbug. RCT

Hall, Mr, squire of Little Alresford with four unmarried daughters. Frugal rather than cruel, he refuses to assist John Gordon's father during the financial crisis that ruined the family. Now 70, he 'never had a headache in his life' (XIII)--a sign not only of good health but also of modest and quiet living. OML RC

Hallam, Jack, young writer and member of the group founding a magazine. He worked hard and became a millionaire. 'Panjandrum' ET GRH

Hallam Hall, George Wade's large rambling house outside London. 'Not If' GRH

Hamel, Isadore, handsome, impractical sculptor, 26 years old, raised at Rome by his disreputable father, whose profession (though not his morals) Isadore has followed. Despite his dim financial prospects, he remains true to Lucy

-233-

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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