Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

I

"'Iceland'" (article). A recent expedition to Iceland on a friend's boat was interesting and surprising. The Icelanders are remarkably sophisticated considering their geographic isolation. Drunkenness is not a problem. The people are hard pressed when supply ships are delayed by ice. A trip to 'the geysers' was truly fascinating. The public officials were interesting and hospitable. Fortnightly Review ( August 1878), 175-90. AKL

"'Ideas of the Day on Policy, The, by Charles Buxton: Critical Notice'" (review). This book purposes to summarize the state of British public opinion on current matters of state politics. It is a curious work, of possible interest to politicians out of touch with general opinion. Fortnightly Review ( 15 January 1866), 650-2. AKL

illustrators and illustrating. Fifteen of Trollope's 47 novels were illustrated in their original magazine-serial or part-publication: more than 300 full-page illustrations and 100 quarter-page vignettes, most of which were included in the first book editions. Any discussion of these illustrations must focus on the former Pre-Raphaelite John Everett* Millais, who illustrated four Trollope novels and supplied frontispieces for two others ( RR and KD), 87 full-page drawings and 19 elaborate vignettes in all. Other illustrators did one book apiece.

Millais's illustrations for Trollope began in 1860 with Framley Parsonage, the work which inaugurated Trollope's career as a serial novelist and enormously enhanced his reputation. The story appeared in the newly launched Cornhill Magazine, published by George Smith and edited by Thackeray. No record survives of Trollope's reaction to Millais's first illustration to Framley Parsonage, but when he saw in proof the second illustration, that of Lucy Robarts in a crinoline dress weeping on her bed, Trollope wrote angrily to Smith that the drawing was 'simply ludicrous, and that some people would think it intentionally so. Smith calmed his author, as did the next illustration: 'The Crawley family is very good,' Trollope wrote to Smith, '& I will now consent to forget the flounced dress.' Millais supplied only six drawings for Framley Parsonage, but the collaboration had begun, of which Trollope later wrote: 'I do not think that more conscientious work was ever done by man. . . . In every figure he drew it was his object to promote the views of the writer whose work he had undertaken to illustrate, and he never spared himself any pains in studying that work, so as to enable himself to do so. I have carried on some of those characters from book to book, and have had my own early ideas impressed indelibly on my memory by the excellence of his delineations' ( Letters 1, 104, 111; Auto VIII). Millais was the quintessential 1860s- style illustrator: representational, naturalistic, realistic, the very opposite of the stylized, exaggerated style of earlier illustrators like Cruikshank and Browne. Millais's style accorded nicely with that of Trollope, who was frequently accused by reviewers of a 'photographic realism' and was even called a 'Pre-Raphaelite in prose'.

Millais's most ambitious work for Trollope came with Orley Farm (40 plates). Trollope, now a very close friend of the artist, was ecstatic over them: he went so far as to have the narrator say in a late chapter that the reader's idea of Lady Mason's sorrow 'will have come to him from the skill of the artist, and not from the words of the writer', and he even suggests that the reader turn back hundreds of pages and look again at the illustration (LXIII). Trollope wrote, 'I have never known a set of illustrations as carefully true, as are these, to the conception of the writer of the book illustrated. I say that as a writer. As a lover of Art I will add that I know no book graced with more exquisite pictures' (MS, Taylor Collection, Princeton). In An Autobiography Trollope called Millais's illustrations for Orley Farm 'the best I have seen in any novel in any language' (IX). This claim was a bit of a stretch, but these illustrations probably rank as the most accomplished to any novel during the 1860s, the 'golden decade' of English black and white wood engraving.

Millais again did the illustrations for The Small House at Allington (18 plates, 19 vignettes); but, because of his commitment to lucrative oil paint-

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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