Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

N

Nantes, important city on the Loire, site of the battle which costs Cathelineau his life. LV

GRH

Napoleon I ( 1769-1821). Soldier, statesman, and self-proclaimed Emperor of France ( 1804), he was among the Trollope family's list of 'great men' of history ( Letters, 1, 23). In 1865 Trollope proposed writing a series of 'Imaginary Meditations' for the Pall Mail Gazette, including 'Napoleon on the death of Morny'. RCT

Napoleon III ( 1808-73), French Emperor ( 1852) who lived in England after two unsuccessful attempts to overthrow the French monarchy ( 1836 and 1840); incited the Franco-Prussian War ( 1870); died in exile ( 1873). Trollope article (signed "'An Englishman'") in Pall Mall Gazette, "'As to the Need of Caesars'", was a response to Napoleon III History of Julius Caesar. Trollope was strongly critical of Napoleon's militarism in Italy in 1867 ( Letters 1, 395) and characterized him as a man without wisdom or honour ( Mullen 285). In Lord Palmerston ( 1882) he wrote that 'even the memory of the Emperor is distasteful' (quoted Super 426). Napoleon, who had supported extravagant commercial speculation, may have contributed to the creation of Melmotte in The Way We Live Now, a novel set in the year of the Emperor's death, 1873 ( Hall 3 81)). RCT

"'Napoleon III's History of Julius Caesar'" (review). The Emperor-author links Julius Caesar, Charlemagne, and Napoleon as men who dramatically advanced civilization, implicitly including himself in this line. The paragraph here quoted [in French] illustrates the foolish, invidious comparisons of England with Rome. Pall Mall Gazette ( 7 February 1865), 2. AKL

"'Nathaniel Hawthorne'" (article). Hawthorne is one of those respected by a circle of peers but not truly famous; however, this is changing, chiefly in response to The Scarlet Letter. He has a 'thoroughly English style', with delicacy reminiscent of Longfellow. Read Mosses from an Old Manse first; it is 'breezy and wholesome'-- especially 'P's Correspondence'. The House of Seven Gables is the most complete and pleasing of his tales. The only weakness is the excessive premonition of events. The attempt at biography in the Life of General Pierce is unfortunate; his tolerance of slavery is obvious. He is, withal, a man of genius. Dublin University Magazine ( October 1855), 463-9. AKL

"'National Gallery, The'" (article). William Wilkins's controversial National Gallery (completed in 1838) was a better building than critics allowed. Admittedly its exterior was every poor', but Wilkins had done his best, being 'crippled' as to space, money, and materials ('he was called on to use columns from other places'). The Louvre is a grander building, but England cannot expect anything like that 'until, as a first step, we bless ourselves with a French government'. But as a place for seeing pictures, the National Gallery is superior. The building ought to open at eight, not ten, in the morning. St James's Magazine, ( September 1861), 163-76. See ART AND ARTISTS; MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITIONS; PRE-RAPHAELITES.

NJH

Nearthewinde, Mr, celebrated parliamentary agent who assists Gustavus Moffat in the Barchester election, though more loyal to Lord De Courcy. A 'sharp fellow', he scrupulously defends the doctrine of purity of election while encouraging friendly publicans. His detection of an irregularity overturns the election. DT NCS

Necropolis, the 'college' and crematorium wherein Britannula's citizens were to be 'deposited' and prepared for one year for compulsory euthanasia at the age of 68. FixP SRB

Neefit, Maryanne (Polly), only daughter of Thomas Neefit. 'As pretty a girl as you shall wish to see . . . her laughing dark eyes were full of good-humour, and looked as though they could be filled also with feeling . . . somewhat given to frank coquetry, and certainly fond of young men' (V). Determined to resist her father's campaign to make a 'lady' of her, she refuses Ralph, the heir, and marries Ontario Moggs. Determinedly signs herself 'Mary Anne' after marriage. RH

ALS

-386-

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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