Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

By R. C. Terry | Go to book overview

W

"'W. M. Thackeray'" (article). With the death in December last of this fine and gentle man, the founder of Cornhill, we have lost not only a famous and admired person, but 'The fine grey head, the dear face with its gentle smile, the sweet manly voice . . . it is of those things lost forever that we are now thinking.' Thackeray's kind heart led him to resign editorship of Cornhill after two years because he hated saying no to so many. He remained connected with this journal; recently his 'Strange to say, on Club Paper' appeared; it ridicules silly gossip about Lord Clyde, with that mingled tenderness toward subject and sarcasm for gossip representative of all his work. Although Vanity Fair will endure as his most- remembered work, Esmond is perhaps the best English novel; no one has illustrated love with such delicacy. Colonel Newcome (of The Newcomes) is the finest character in English fiction--of all fiction save Don Quixote. A biography must be written, and carefully, to do him justice. While the burial was simple and the grave plain, in time there must be a bust of Thackeray in Westminster Abbey. Cornhill ( February 1864), 134-7. See also THACKERARY; THACKERAY, WILLIAM MAKEPEACE. AKL

Waddle, Mr, foreman of Neefit's breeches- maker's shop. Neefit's confidant who 'did not understand men as well as his master . . . and . . . knew nothing of his master's ambitious hopes' (V). RH ALS

Waddy, Frederick (fl. 1873-8), exhibited pencil drawings in London ( 1878) and drew for Portraits of the Day published by the Tinsley Brothers ( 1873). Waddy cartooned Trollope for Once a Week ( June 1872), showing him atop a stack of his novels holding a clergyman puppet. RCT

Wade, George. Afraid of being caught guaranteeing money, he rudely refuses his brother- in-law's request for a signature. 'Not if' RCT

Wales. Although he surveyed six counties for the Post Office and spent family holidays on the south coast, Trollope was not imaginatively attached to the principality; after weeks of rain, he could think of 'nothing worse' to wish any enemy 'than [lifelong] residence in South Wales' ( Letters 1,33). His Welsh tenantry in Cousin Henry, the sole novel set in Wales, speak exactly like their Barset counterparts, and place names are linguistically inaccurate or comic tongue-twisters, like Lord Llwddythlw, the only Welsh connection in Marion Fay. However, the Welsh setting surrounds the dynastic concerns of Cousin Henry with comic irony, since Jones is as commonplace as Smith is in England. AWJ

Wales, Prince of ( Edward VII) ( 1841-1910), reigned 1901-10. The Prince presided at the Royal Literary Fund dinner ( May 1864) when Trollope responded to the toast to literature. Trollope was formally presented at a levee ( March 1868) prior to departure for America on postal business and international copyright. The Prince occasionally dropped in at the Cosmopolitan Club, which Trollope used, but it was coming out of the Turf Club on one occasion that the Prince greeted him without receiving any acknowledgement, the social gaffe being due to Trollope's poor eyesight. It became a joke next time they met ( Glendinning 342). In Phineas Redux the narrator observes that when the Prince strolled into the Universe Club those 'with royal instincts' gravitated to him (XLVI). Despite this nicely ironic comment, Trollope would probably have been one of them.

RCT

Walker, George, elderly Silverbridge attorney who heads the Liberal political interests of the borough. DC JMR

Walker, George. Visiting Suez the narrator, a businessman, narrow-minded and pompous, is flattered by Mahmoud al Ackbar, thinking he is his namesake Sir George Walker. "'Walker'" TAC2

GRH

Walker, George, lawyer of the firm of Walker & Winthrop, and one of the leading men of Silverbridge. A short, corpulent, but comely man in his fifties, he prosecutes the case against Revd Josiah Crawley, while expressing sympathy for

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Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • For Kathleen Tillotson v
  • Preface vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix
  • Contents xi
  • HOW TO USE THIS BOOK xii
  • THEMATIC OVERVIEW xiii
  • CONTRIBUTORS xix
  • LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS xxiii
  • J 1
  • B 31
  • C 77
  • D 142
  • E 170
  • F 194
  • G 214
  • H 233
  • I 268
  • J 275
  • K 285
  • L 296
  • M 342
  • N 386
  • O 399
  • P 412
  • Q 455
  • R 456
  • S 474
  • T 514
  • U 562
  • V 565
  • W 570
  • CHRONOLOGY 599
  • FAMILY TREES 607
  • MAPS 622
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY 623
  • PICTURE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 625
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