Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories

By Arthur Conan Doyle; S. C. Roberts | Go to book overview

The Empty House

IT was in the spring of the year 1894 that all London was interested, and the fashionable world dismayed, by the murder of the Honourable Ronald Adair, under most unusual and inexplicable circumstances. The public has already learned those particulars of the crime which came out in the police investigation; but a good deal was suppressed upon that occasion, since the case for the prosecution was so overwhelmingly strong that it was not necessary to bring forward all the facts. Only now, at the end of nearly ten years, am I allowed to supply those missing links which make up the whole of that remarkable chain. The crime was of interest in itself, but that interest was as nothing to me compared to the inconceivable sequel, which afforded me the greatest shock and surprise of any event in my adventurous life. Even now, after this long interval, I find myself thrilling as I think of it, and feeling once more that sudden flood of joy, amazement, and incredulity which utterly submerged my mind. Let me say to that public which has shown some interest in those glimpses which I have occasionally given them of the thoughts and actions of a very remarkable man that they are not to blame me if I have not shared my knowledge with them, for I should have considered it my first duty to have done so had I not been barred by a positive prohibition from his own lips, which was only withdrawn upon the third of last month.

It can be imagined that my close intimacy with Sherlock Holmes had interested me deeply in crime, and that after his disappearance I never failed to read

-359-

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Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • SHERLOCK HOLMES SELECTED STORIES i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT xxiv
  • Silver Blaze 1
  • The Speckled Band 34
  • The Sign of Four 67
  • A Scandal in Bohemia 206
  • The Naval Treaty 236
  • The Blue Carbuncle 279
  • The Greek Interpreter 305
  • The Red-Headed League 329
  • The Empty House 359
  • The Missing Three-Quarter 387
  • His Last Bow - An Epilogue of Sherlock Holmes 415
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