Scotland in the Age of the Disruption

By Stewart J. Brown; Michael Fry | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

PAUL BAXTER, M.A., Ph.D., is Head of Central Services, British Library Science, Reference and Information Service. A scholar of the interactions of science and belief in Victorian Scotland, his publications include "'Brewster, Evangelism and the Disruption of the Church of Scotland'", in E. D. Morrison-Low and J. R. R. Christie (eds), Martyr of Science. Sir David Brewster ( Edinburgh, 1984).

STEWART J. BROWN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., has been Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Edinburgh since 1988. He is the author of Thomas Chalmers and the Godly Commonwealth in Scotland ( Oxford, 1982) -- awarded the Saltire Society History Prize -- and is joint editor of the Scottish Historical Rmieto.

ANGUS CALDER, M.A., D. Phil., has taught at the Universities of Nairobi, Malawi and Zimbabwe, and is currently Reader in Arts at the Open University in Scotland. His books include: The People's War. Britain 1939-45 ( London, 1969), Revolutionary Empire: The Rise of the English-Speaking Empires from the Fifteenth Century to the 1780s ( London, 1981), and The Myth of the Blitz ( London, 1991).

MICHAEL FRY, M.A., is a freelance writer and journalist based in Edinburgh. His books include Patronage and Principle: A Political History of Modern Scotland ( Aberdeen, 1987) and The Dundas Despotism ( Edinburgh, 1992).

PETER L. M. HILLIS, M.A., Ph.D., is Head of the Social Sciences Division and History Section at Jordanhill College in Glasgow. Among his articles are "'Presbyterianism and Social Class in Mid-Nineteenth Century Glasgow'", in Journal of Ecclesiastical History ( 1990), and "'Education and Evangelisation: Presbyterian Missions in Mid-Victorian Glasgow'", in Scottish Historical Review ( 1987).

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