Scotland in the Age of the Disruption

By Stewart J. Brown; Michael Fry | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
The Ten Years' Conflict and the Disruption of 1843

STEWART J. BROWN

IN MAY 1843, the religious Establishment of Scotland was broken up as over a third of the ministers and perhaps half the lay members left the national Church to form the Free Protesting Church of Scotland. 1 Most of the outgoing ministers gave up secure incomes, comfortable manses and respectable social status for an uncertain future. They were prepared to sacrifice their worldly interests for a principle -- that of the spiritual independence of the Church. Equally impressive were the achievements of the Free Church in erecting new churches, schools, colleges and manses, and in supporting a vigorous home and overseas mission. Within a few years, the Free Church had created an alternative national Church, with parochial churches and schools covering nearly the whole of Scotland. For many who left the Establishment, the Disruption was a deliverance: those going out were compared to the Israelites leaving the bondage of Egypt and trusting God to bring them to a better land. 2 For most of the outgoing ministers and lay members, however, there was also a sense of loss -- the break-up of the national Church, the parting of friends and a waning sense of Scotland as a unified Christian commonwealth.

Those remaining in the Established Church of Scotland also experienced trials. While some welcomed the secession as a means of ridding the Church of disturbers of the existing order, many more experienced pain at the loss of so many able clergymen and committed lay members. 3 Some of those who remained had been allied with the outgoing ministers in the causes of Church Extension and Church Defence, but at the Disruption felt conscience-bound to stay at their posts within the historic Church which their ancestors had suffered to preserve and which God had called them to serve. Others simply did not believe that the spiritual independence of the Church of Scotland was under threat. Those remaining within the Church of Scotland endured taunts and accusations of being self-serving or cowardly, of having betrayed the national Church for the state's gold. In turn, they often grew suspicious and defensive. Friendships were severed, families divided, and bitterness would continue for generations.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scotland in the Age of the Disruption
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.