The Myth of the Heroine: The Female Bildungsroman in the Twentieth Century: Dorothy Richardson, Simone de Beauvoir, Doris Lessing, Christa Wolf

By Esther Kleinbord Labovitz | Go to book overview

Conclusion

Toward a Definition of the Female Bildungsroman

From my initial observation, citing the absence of the female heroine from the canon of literary theory and criticism on the Bildungsroman, to the actual identification of four twentieth- century female heroines who represent the genre, the challenge to define this latter-day arrival grew steadily. If a female Bildungsroman tradition did exist--and some doubted it--its legitimacy as a paradigm was still in question when this study was first undertaken. Parenthetically, I might remind the reader that the exclusion of the female heroine from the Bildungsronwn tradition was a historical, social, and cultural fact. To paraphrase the historian, Gerda Lemer, who commented on the absence of women from history, female heroines have been left out of the Bildungsroman not because of evil conspiracies of men, in general, or male novelists, in particular, but because the Bildungsroman was considered only in male- centered terms. 1

In the 1970's, Annis Pratt, searching for the myth of the heroine, similar but not identical to the male Bildungsroman, 2 gave to this genre an early definition; while Martin Swales suggested that recent works by women novelists "concerned with women's search for identity" 3 related them to the Bildungsroman tradition. Still later, women's studies reevaluating fictional heroines of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries began to incorporate the concept of Bildung in feminist literary criticism, broadening the term to include all experiences, however diffused, but falling short of the quest for self-knowledge and self-development, a major element of Bildung. In this present study, with its insistence upon following a literary, rather than popular, interpretation of Bildung, the

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Myth of the Heroine: The Female Bildungsroman in the Twentieth Century: Dorothy Richardson, Simone de Beauvoir, Doris Lessing, Christa Wolf
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents iii
  • PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION v
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • 1 - Dorothy Richardson: Pilgrimage: Four Volumes1 11
  • Notes 66
  • 2 - Simone De Beauvoir: Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter1 73
  • Notes 142
  • 3 - Doris Lessing: Children of Violence1, Five Volumes 145
  • Notes 198
  • 4 - Christa Wolf: 201
  • Notes 240
  • Conclusion 245
  • Notes 258
  • Appendix 259
  • Bibliography 265
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.