Art as Culture: An Introduction to the Anthropology of Art

By Evelyn Payne Hatcher | Go to book overview

Glossary with notes on various usages
Concepts such as "culture" and "art" are not definable in the way that objects can be defined; there are no right or wrong definitions, just more or less usual or useful ones. The definitions here give a sense of how a word is used in this book; a few comparisons with other usages may clarify the ideas behind these words, and indicate where ideas differ. A few terms not used in the text are included for reference. Terms for technical processes are omitted to keep the glossary to a reasonable length; they can be found elsewhere fairly easily.
abstract, 1) an intangible idea as contrasted to a concrete object; 2) art that uses a very few properties selected ("abstracted") to represent visible reality. Objects may, or may not, be recognizable; 3) often used for art in which there is no representational subject matter; expression is through formal qualities
acculturation, the process of interaction between two societies in which the culture of the society in the subordinate position is modified to conform to the culture of the dominant society.
ambiguity, the quality of being unclear in meaning, usually because of more than one meaning.
Anasazi, the prehistoric culture of the Pueblo Indians of Arid America, sometimes also used for contemporary Pueblos.
anthropology, the study of human beings in the broadest possible context, including the biological and cultural past, recent social and cultural diversity, and the relations of all aspects of human life to each other.
anthropomorphic, in human form.
anthropomorphism, the attribution of human form to any object.
archaic, an early phase of a style or civilization; also used for certain stylistic features thought to be characteristic of such early phases.
archetype, original model, pattern, or prototype. In the Jungian approach this idea applies to primordial human images as contrasted with culture-specific symbols.
art, there are even more definitions of the word "art" than of the word "culture"; the most usual are 1) application of knowledge and skill to affect a desired result, and 2) skill used to achieve an esthetic result.

There has been discussion as to whether all peoples have a concept of art, depending on whether they have a word for it; it is hard for academics to conceive a concept

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Art as Culture: An Introduction to the Anthropology of Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Theoretical Note xi
  • About the Illustrations xiii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Introduction to the Second Edition xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Contexts and Comparisons: The Anthropological Approach 1
  • Further Reading 20
  • Chapter 2 - Where? The Geographical Dimension 21
  • Further Reading 54
  • Chapter 3 - How? The Technological Means 55
  • Further Reading 84
  • Chapter 4 - Who? The Psychological Perspective 85
  • Further Reading 112
  • Chapter 5 - Why? Social Contexts and Social Functions 113
  • Further Reading 134
  • Chapter 6 - "What. . . ?" Art as Communication 135
  • Further Reading 166
  • Chapter 7 - When and Whence? The Time Dimension 167
  • Further Reading 196
  • Chapter 8 - The Esthetic Mystery 197
  • Further Reading 207
  • Chapter 9 - The Global Context: The 15th Century 209
  • Chapter 10 - Globalization: The 20th Century 229
  • Ethnographic Notes and Index 255
  • Glossary with notes on various usages 287
  • Bibliography 303
  • Bibliography for Second Edition 327
  • Subject and Author Index 331
  • A NOTE ON THE TYPE IN THIS BOOK 337
  • About the Author *
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