Science, Religion and Authority: Lessons from the Galileo Affair

By Richard J. Blackwell | Go to book overview

Prefatory

The Wisconsin-Alpha Chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, the International Honor Society for Philosophy at Marquette University, each year invites a scholar to deliver a lecture in honor of St. Thomas Aquinas.

The 1998 Aquinas Lecture, Science, Religion and Authority: Lessons from the Galileo Affair, was delivered in the Todd Wehr Chemistry Building on Sunday, February 22, 1998, by Richard J. Blackwell, Professor of Philosophy at Saint Louis University.

Professor Blackwell received his undergraduate education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at John Carroll University. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy at Saint Louis University and then did post-doctoral studies in theoretical physics at John Carroll before returning to Saint Louis University in 1961 where he has taught for the past thirty-seven years. He became Professor of Philosophy in 1966 and held the Danforth Chair in the Humanities from 1986 to 1996.

Professor Blackwell is the author of Discovery in the Physical Sciences( 1969), A Bibliography of the Philosophy of Science ( 1983), Christiaan Huygens' "The Pendulum Clock or Geometrical Demonstrations concerning the Motion of Pendula as Applied to Clocks" ( 1986), and Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible ( 1991). He has translated Thomas Campanella A Defense of Galileo, the Mathematician from Florence ( 1994),

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Science, Religion and Authority: Lessons from the Galileo Affair
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Prefatory 5
  • Contents 9
  • Introduction - An Unstable History 11
  • Concluding Remarks 54
  • Notes 59
  • The Aquinas Lectures Published by the Marquette University Press Milwaukee Wi 53201-1881 Usa 67
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