Cold War Statesmen Confront the Bomb: Nuclear Diplomacy since 1945

By John Lewis Gaddis; Philip H. Gordon et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES

Chapter 1
1.
John M. Blum (ed.), The Price of Vision: The Diary of Henry A. Wallace, 1942-1946 ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1973), 474. Some of Truman's key advisers had recommended that he halt all bombing of Japan, hoping for a surrender announcement. The fact that he suspended only nuclear bombing is significant of an early drawing of a line between nuclear weapons and other weapons. For a full analysis, see Barton J. Bernstein , "The Perils and Politics of Surrender: Ending the War with Japan and Avoiding the Third Atomic Bomb", Pacific Historical Review, 46/ 1 ( Feb. 1977), 1-28, and "Understanding the Atomic Bomb and the Japanese Surrender: Missed Opportunities, Little-Known Near Disasters, and Modern Memory", Diplomatic History, 19/ 2 (Spring 1995), 227-74.
2.
Public Papers of the Presidents: Harry S. Truman, 1945 ( Washington: Government Printing Office, 1961), 362-3. (Needless to say, most quotations from and other specifics about the individual statesmen treated in this book are to be found in the appropriate chapters. Each note to this introduction has an implicit 'See below' clause.)
3.
Diary of Henry L. Stimson, 22 July 1945, quoted in Herbert Feis, The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1966), 87.
4.
Address in the House of Commons, 1 Mar. 1955, reproduced in Vital Speeches of the Day, 21 ( 15 Mar. 1955), 1090-4.
5.
Pravda, 25 Sept. 1946. See, in addition to the essay on Stalin below, David Holloway, Stalin and the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic Energy, 1939-1956 ( Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1994).
6.
Yuli Khariton and Yuri Smirnov, Mifi i realnost sovenskogo atomnogo proekta (The Myths and Reality of the Soviet Atomic Project) (Russian Federal Nuclear Centre: Arzamas-16, 1994), 15.
7.
Hermann Hagedorn, The Bomb That Fell on America ( Santa Barbara, Calif.: Pacific Coast Publishing Co., 1946), quoted in Paul Boyer, By the Bomb's Early Light: American Thought and Culture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age ( New York: Pantheon books, 1985), 280.
8.
Spencer Weart, Nuclear Fear: A History of Images ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988), 193.
9.
John Mueller, Retreat from Doomsday: The Obsolescence of Major War ( New York: Basic Books, 1989).
10.
Norman Angell, The Great Illusion: A Study of the Relation of Military Power to National Advantage ( London: Heinemann, 1914).
11.
Alexander L. George, Bridging the Gap: Theory and Practice in Foreign Policy ( Washington: United States Institute of Peace Press, 1993) is a thoughtful and penetrating essay, arguing the affirmative side of the case -- that history can be used to build a body of more or less verifiable theory. Ernest R. May, "History -- Theory -- Practice", Diplomatic History, 18 4 (Fall 1994), 589-603, partly an essay on George's book, summarizes some arguments to the contrary.

-284-

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