The Strange Case of the Spotted Mice and Other Classic Essays on Science

By Peter Medawar | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
The Phenomenon of Man
1.
( London, 1959).
2.
p. 153.
3.
p. 16 and again p. 18; p. 19.
4.
pp. 12, 13.

Chapter 2
Hypothesis and imagination
1.
Hypotheses non sequor, runs an early draft of Newton's famous disclaimer, which we are to translate, as Whewell did, 'I feign no hypotheses': see I. Bernard Cohen, Isis, 51, 589, 1960. Newton did, of course, use and propound hypotheses in the modern sense of [that word; the unwholesome flavour which Newton found in the word is discussed below.
2.
The fundamental axiom of empiricism--nihil in intellectu quod non prius in sensu--is of course mistaken. Animals inherit information (for example, on how to build nests, or what to sing) in the form of a sort of chromosomal tape-recording. This instinctual knowledge is not arrived at by association of ideas, anyhow of sensory ideas received by the animal in its own lifetime.
3.
The Organization of Behavior by D. O. Hebb ( New York, 1949), especially p. 31.
4.
Here and hereafter I quote from the following works of the authors cited under heading 4 in the text: The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences, by William Whewell, in 2 vols, 2nd ed. ( London, 1847; 1st ed., 1840); The Principles of Science, by W. Stanley Jevons, 2nd ed., revised ( London, 1877; 1st ed., 1873); The Art of Reasoning, by Samuel Neil : twenty articles in successive issues of the first two vols of the British Controversialist ( 1850, 1851), of which Neil was editor; particularly vol. 2, no. 11, Collected Papers of C. S. Peirce, ed. C. Hartshorne and P. Weiss, vol. 2, Elements of Logic ( Cambridge, Mass., 1932), vol. 6, Scientific Metaphysics ( 1935).

-218-

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The Strange Case of the Spotted Mice and Other Classic Essays on Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword - The Phenomenon of Medawar v
  • Contents xiii
  • Introduction xiv
  • 1 - The Phenomenon of man 1
  • 2 - Hypothesis and imagination 12
  • 3 - Is the scientific paper a fraud? 33
  • 4 - The Act of Creation 40
  • 5 - Darwin's illness 52
  • 6 - Two conceptions of science 59
  • 7 - Science and the sanctity of life 72
  • 8 - J.B.S. 86
  • 9 - Lucky Jim 94
  • 10 - On 'the effecting of all things possible' 104
  • 11 - Further comments on psychoanalysis 120
  • 12 - The strange case of the spotted mice 132
  • 13 - Unnatural science 144
  • 14 - Florey story 162
  • 15 - In defence of doctors 170
  • 16 - Expectation and prediction 182
  • 17 - Scientific fraud 196
  • 18 - Son of stroke*** 203
  • 19 - The question of the existence of God 207
  • 20 - On living a bit longer 212
  • Notes 218
  • Sources 228
  • Index 231
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