Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa

By Roland Oliver | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
WORSE ON LAND THAN AT SEA

Johnston did not have the opportunity of directing for long the new phase of British policy which he had initiated in the Oil Rivers Protectorate. Two and a half years on the West Coast of Africa was a considerable spell for any European in the insalubrious conditions of the eighteen-eighties, and when Hewett was at last ready to return to his post in May 1888, his deputy was at once given leave of absence.

It was a different homecoming, this, from the last two. Then he had been an adventurer, charged with experience it is true, but with no certain future, his only assets the wasting ones of his memory and his notebooks. Now he had the security of an official position, the right to a fixed period of rest on full pay, the certainty of employment at the end of it. Then he had had to seek his audiences, to accept with gratitude the invitations of a few learned societies, to fashion and refashion his wares to suit the varying tastes of editors and public. Now he could think more of reputation and less of guineas. He could turn his many talents to the cultivation of a more limited but also a more influential circle. Curiously enough, he was still painfully lacking in self-assurance. 'I do believe in myself,' he had written to his father only a year before, 'more because of my strong will and intense ambition than for any particular qualities I imagine myself to possess. Indeed I am saddled with many disadvantages--my insignificant appearance, my poverty, my lack of family interest in Government circles. I have to fight the world alone. I must creep when I would fly. But if I live, I will be great some day, and may you live to see me so.'1

He had, however, an unusually friendly base in the African Department of the Foreign Office, which did not under Anderson's kindly rule regard Vice-Consuls on leave as unwanted strangers who had best keep away until their next assignments were near. He spent much time at the Office and he also made his home near it. He had struck up an enduring friendship with Oswald Crawfurd, who when not in London occupied the delectable post of British Consul at Oporto, and

____________________
1
Alex Johnston, op. cit., p. 115.

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.