Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa

By Roland Oliver | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
THE GOD-GIVEN TASK OF SUBDUING
THE EARTH

UGANDA, when Johnston assumed his Special Commission, was in its seventh year as a British Protectorate. With its eastern frontier running, as it then did, right through the middle of modern Kenya, along the eastern scarp of the Rift Valley, it was about three times the size of Nyasaland and had about two and a half times as many inhabitants. As in Nyasaland, the greater part of the area was still in practice unadministered. Garrisoned forts were strung out along the main lines of communication, along the caravan-route from the East Coast to Lake Victoria and on to Ruwenzori in the far west, and from Lake Albert down the Nile towards the recently reconquered Sudan. Real political control, however, was only exercised, and that cautiously, in the small area between Lakes Victoria, Edward and Albert which comprised the native kingdoms of Buganda, Toro and Bunyoro. Buganda had been since 1877 an important mission field of both the Anglican and the Roman Catholic Churches, and British political influence had inserted rather than imposed itself during a period of social revolution and civil war resulting from the conflicts between pagan, Muslim and Christian on the one hand, and between Roman Catholic and Protestant Christians on the other. Into this medley had come in 1889 the representatives of the Imperial British East Africa Company, first Jackson and then Lugard, who by astute diplomacy and by the judicious employment of a tiny force of independent troops had managed to hold the balance between the warring factions, and even in some measure to unite them under a coalition of Protestant and Catholic chiefs. The Imperial Government had stepped into the shoes of the financially ailing Chartered Company, in Uganda in 1893 and in Kenya--the East Africa Protectorate as it was then called--in 1895. Commissioners had been appointed, together with civil and military officers, and grantsin-aid had been voted on what was, by comparison with Nyasaland, the fairly liberal scale of about £50,000 a year for each Protectorate. Most important of all the building of a strategic railway from Mombasa to Lake Victoria had been set

-287-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.