Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa

By Roland Oliver | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
TWENTY-SIX YEARS

IT took Johnston some time to realize that he was being squeezed out. His initial welcome indeed surpassed all expectations. Sir Clement Hill gave an official dinner. Lord Salisbury asked him to Hatfield. The King's interest in his mission seemed more than perfunctory. An outstandingly appreciative letter from Lord Lansdowne followed him to Guernsey, whither he had retreated for the summer months to rest and to write. The high honour of the G.C.M.G. came in due course. Yet already by the autumn of 1901 the future was beginning to look a little ominous. He had returned from Guernsey in October and was living in a borrowed house near Shere in Surrey, writing The Uganda Protectorate and waiting for his next appointment. He had made it clear that he could not serve again in any part of the tropics where he might be liable to a recurrence of blackwater fever. This made him, he realized, more difficult to promote. Even if East Africa had been unified according to his recommendations, he could not have consented to be the first Governor-General. Still, he thought he could reasonably hope for one of the minor Colonial office governorships--Cyprus, perhaps, or Malta--or, that failing, at least for one of the lesser Legations, perhaps not even necessarily as far afield as Bangkok or Bagota.

But he was wrong. Chamberlain was still at the Colonial Office and determined to exercise his patronage without assistance from an ageing Prime Minister or a new Foreign Secretary. And at the Foreign Office things had changed distinctly for the worse. It was not only Hill in place of Anderson and Lansdowne in place of Salisbury. Barrington still ruled the Private Office, but it was a Barrington who was noticeably less cordial than he who had served Lord Salisbury. It was not that Lansdowne himself was unfriendly, but that the permanent officials were once more firmly in control of appointments. In December Lady Johnston's uncle, Lord de Saumarez, warned him not to expect too much. 'The Office as a body hates the introduction of new blood into the service, and I am not surprised that you find the officials hostile. I saw Edward Malet last week in Paris, and in talking over sundry changes in the heads of missions, I asked

-338-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir Harry Johnston & the Scramble for Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.