The Man in the Dugout: Fifteen Big League Managers Speak Their Minds

By Donald Honig | Go to book overview

8
BOB SHAWKEY

JAMES ROBERT SHAWKEY Born: December 4, 1890, Brookville, Pennsylvania Managerial career: New York Yankees, 1930

For years one of the American League's finest pitchers, Bob Shawkey was the Yankee manager between the Miller Huggins and Joe McCarthy reigns. He later served as baseball coach at Dartmouth.

Miller Huggins had died suddenly, you see. It happened late in September, just before the season ended, in 1929. There were just a few games left, and Art Fletcher and I were running the club. We'd been coaching under Hug.

One day during a game Colonel Ruppert, who owned the Yankees, and Ed Barrow, who was the general manager, sent somebody into the dugout to tell me to come meet them under the stands. When I walked up to them, Barrow said, "Bob, how would you like to have the job?"

I wasn't particularly surprised to be asked. I'd been with the Yankees a long time and had always got along well with everybody.

"I think I'd like to give it a try," I said.

So that's the way it came about. That's the way I was hired to manage the Yankees in 1930.

An awful lot of prestige came along with that job. Seemed like everybody in New York knew you. Wherever you went, you got the royal treatment--in restaurants, stores, all over. It sure was a long way from the farm where I'd grown up. That was in Sigel, Pennsylvania.

-166-

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The Man in the Dugout: Fifteen Big League Managers Speak Their Minds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Bobby Bragan 7
  • 2 - Burleigh Grimes 30
  • 3 - Eddie Sawyer 59
  • 4 - Joe Mccarthy 80
  • 5 - Walter Alston 96
  • 6 - Paul Richards 118
  • 7 - Ossie Bluege 144
  • 8 - Bob Shawkey 166
  • 9 - Al Lopez 180
  • 10 - Dick Williams 198
  • 11 - Roger Peckinpaugh 212
  • 12 - Mayo Smith 230
  • 13 - Billy Herman 241
  • 14- Luke Sewell 256
  • 15 - Jimmy Dykes 274
  • Appendix: Statistics 297
  • Index 335
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