Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

IX
MILITARY GOVERNOR

WITH the exception of Virginia alone, Tennessee was the chief battle ground of the Civil War. Four hundred and fifty-four battles and engagements were fought out within her borders.1 Much of the fighting took place in Eastern Tennessee. The armies of the Union and of the Confederacy marched and countermarched through her mountain passes and availed themselves of her principal railroad as a medium of communication and supply.

The mountaineers suffered much for their loyalty to the Union cause, yet they never faltered in their steadfast courage. In August, 1861, Confederate soldiers overran this region. Loyal men were impressed into the Southern ranks, the Confederate conscription law was executed, so as surely to include those of known loyalty to the Lincoln government. Any who offered resistance were certain to await the fate of traitors. Crops were confiscated and sent South while uncontrolled groups of mounted men burned barns and houses and drove off the cattle before them. Special objects of plunder were Johnson's old supporters.2 "Parson Brownlow's book" is a Jeremiad of these sufferings.

It was with no docility that the hardy mountaineers submitted when they had to, to these indignities, and always they saw the vision of a Union army coming to their aid. "They look for the reëstablishment of the Federal authority," wrote a Southern sympathizer to Jefferson Davis on November 12th, 1861, "with as much confidence as the Jews look for the coming of the Messiah, and I feel quite sure when I assert that no event or circumstance can change or modify their hope."3 But these Unionists had a spokesman within the Senate of the United States in Andrew Johnson. On January 31st, 1862, he again laid before the country

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.