Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

XXVII
THE RADICALS DECLARE WAR ON ANDREW JOHNSON

WHILE Congress was not in session "to hinder and embarrass," Johnson had reanimated the Southern states and had put their "governments into successful operation with order prevailing and the Union reëstablished." And now December was at hand and the "disturbing elements" were trooping into Washington, determined if they could to upset all that he had done, as they had sought to hinder and dismay his predecessor while engaged in the same work.

Among the Senators whom we shall later meet, there came William Pitt Fessenden and Lott M. Morrill from Maine, Luke P. Poland from Vermont, Charles Sumner and Henry Wilson from Massachusetts, Henry B. Anthony and William Sprague from Rhode Island, James Dixon and Lafayette S. Foster from Connecticut, the latter the President of the Senate and since Andrew Johnson's elevation, the acting Vice-President of the United States. From New York came Ira Harris and Edwin P. Morgan, from New Jersey Willaim Wright and John P. Stockton, from Maryland Reverdy Johnson, from Ohio John Sherman and Benjamin Wade, from Iowa James W. Grimes and from Illinois Lyman Trumbull.1

Among the members of the lower House were these: James G. Blaine from Maine, who was later to aspire, always unsuccessfully, to the Presidency. From Massachusetts, George S. Boutwell, Henry L. Dawes and Oakes Ames, whose name shortly was to become infamous because of "Credit Mobilier"; from New York Henry J. Raymond and Roscoe Conkling, from Pennsylvania Thaddeus Stevens; from Ohio James M. Ashley, and two subsequent Presidents, Rutherford B. Hayes and James A. Garfield; from Indiana George W. Julian and Schuyler Colfax, the Speaker of

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