Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage

By Lloyd Paul Stryker | Go to book overview

LV
THE 1867 ELECTIONS GO AGAINST THE RADICALS

WHAT during these times was happening in the North? We have seen something of the politicians and the press,--the Evangelical Church was enlisted with them. With the ineptitude sometimes displayed by clergymen when they depart from spiritual leadership to take the direction of things temporal, the churches had lent themselves, albeit with good motives, to an unjust cause. They sent down their missionaries with the carpet-baggers; both taught much the same doctrine.1 "Emissaries of Christ and the radical party," an Alabama Leader called them. They taught the negro to regard the Southern whites as "their natural enemies, who, if possible, would put them back in slavery."2 Other Christian missionaries from the North were said to inculcate the doctrine that "Christ died for negroes and Yankees, not for rebels."3

But these were the politicians and the preachers,--what was engaging the attention of the ordinary citizen? The North was busy making money! The hitherto undreamed of natural resources of the country were being now explored and tapped. It was the beginning of the modern industrial America.

"A stranger in traveling through the loyal states in 1864," wrote Hugh McCulloch, "would have seen little to indicate that they were engaged in a civil war of unexampled magnitude. He would have seen men pursuing their usual avocations with ardor; the farmer and mechanic busily employed; new factories being built; the marts crowded with buyers and sellers; and upon inquiry he would have learned that the foreign and domestic trade, and manufacturing in its various branches had never been so prosperous, and that labor had never been so well rewarded."4

But if this was true throughout the war, how much more true

-507-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Johnson: A Study in Courage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 886

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.