Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury

By Margaret Hope Bacon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
Conscience in the Classroom

In the fall of 1934, the Cadburys returned to their house on Buckingham Place in Cambridge. A new family, the Emersons, had moved in next door in their absence, and there were children for Winnie to play with. Lydia Cadbury approached her new neighbor one day when they were both out hanging clothes with the question, "How is it that you and your husband have such beautiful children even if you are both homely?" It was the beginning of a friendship.1

Lydia Cadbury's reputation for forthrightness was forever cemented in the Cambridge community by an event at a social evening during that first year back. A Harvard professor and a female colleague had gone to Reno together, filed for divorce from their respective mates, and subsequently married each other. It was an unusual enough occurrence in the 1930s to cause tongues to wag, but in private. At the party Lydia Cadbury saw the couple in question together and asked Henry Cadbury in a voice loud enough to be overheard:

Henry, does thee know that that woman has committed adultery? Lydia, I only know that she has not committed it with me, came the reply.2

Lydia Cadbury also became famous for riding her bicycle all over Cambridge. Once, arriving at a corner where a police officer was directing traffic, she paused at the light and balanced herself by resting her hand on his shoulder. Someone took a picture, which was published in a Cambridge paper and became part of the growing Lydia Cadbury legend. People sometimes wondered if Henry

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Quaker Roots 1
  • Chapter 2 - Teaching and Learning 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Anvil of War 32
  • Chapter 4 - On Quaker Service 50
  • Chapter 5 - The Life of a Scholar 65
  • Chapter 6 - The Beloved Community 79
  • Chapter 7 - A Year Abroad 93
  • Chapter 8 - Conscience in the Classroom 106
  • Chapter 9 - War and Darkness 125
  • Chapter 10 - Translating the New Testament 138
  • Chapter 11 - Defending Our Liberties 157
  • Chapter 12 - An Active Retirement 173
  • Chapter 13 - A Green Old Age 196
  • Chapter 14 - An Appropriate Farewell 213
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography Manuscript Collections 235
  • Index 245
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.