Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury

By Margaret Hope Bacon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11
Defending Our Liberties

With the unsettled war years behind them, the Cadbury family was beginning to grow, to everyone's delight. On November 26, 1949, the first grandchild, Dorothea Musgrave, was born. She was premature, and Betty and John Musgrave were swamped by the hospital expenses. Henry and Lydia Cadbury, who could be very frugal, could also be very generous. All the bills must be sent directly from the hospital to him, Henry Cadbury insisted.

The following June, Christopher married Mary Foster, a Rhode Island Wilburite Friend whom he had met while teaching at the Olney Friends School in Barnesville, Ohio. It was during that same summer that Winifred, the younger daughter, met Martin Beer, a teacher at Westtown School, attending the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The two were married in June of 1951.

In the spring of 1950 Henry Cadbury was busier than ever with lectures. He persuaded the Ministers' Association of Springfield, Massachusetts, to devote a Sunday in April to peace and a discussion of "Some Quaker proposals for Peace." He himself spoke at one of the churches, warning against the growing fear psychology in the United States. "Fear is a bad advisor," he said. A few weeks later he addressed a Dartmouth Peace Conference. In early June he helped the Mt. Holly, New Jersey, Friends Meeting celebrate its 175th anniversary. Afterward came the Cape May conference, where he gave a workshop on some parables in Luke and spoke on the topic "Precept and Practice."1

In this workshop he once more returned to the danger of "nominalism," of substituting words for the matter one wishes to express. "The great historical religions express themselves so fully in words that we get a verbal familiarity with the things of God which is

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Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Quaker Roots 1
  • Chapter 2 - Teaching and Learning 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Anvil of War 32
  • Chapter 4 - On Quaker Service 50
  • Chapter 5 - The Life of a Scholar 65
  • Chapter 6 - The Beloved Community 79
  • Chapter 7 - A Year Abroad 93
  • Chapter 8 - Conscience in the Classroom 106
  • Chapter 9 - War and Darkness 125
  • Chapter 10 - Translating the New Testament 138
  • Chapter 11 - Defending Our Liberties 157
  • Chapter 12 - An Active Retirement 173
  • Chapter 13 - A Green Old Age 196
  • Chapter 14 - An Appropriate Farewell 213
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography Manuscript Collections 235
  • Index 245
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