Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury

By Margaret Hope Bacon | Go to book overview

Notes
INTRODUCTION
1. Transcript, Proceedings, U.S. District Court for Eastern District Pennsylvania, August 1, 1973, Civil Action, American Friends Service Committee, Lorraine Cleveland and Leonard Cadwallader, Plaintiffs, v. the United States of America, Defendant. American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) Archives, Philadelphia, Pa.
2. Report of address given on April 24 at Toronto Meeting House and on April 25 at the formal opening of Montreal Meeting House, Canadian Friend 60, no. 3 ( June-July 1964): 3-9.
3. The Basis of Quaker Political Action, speech given by Henry J. Cadbury at the Tenth Anniversary of the Friends Committee on National Legislation. Washington, D.C.: Published FCNL. 10-1-54.
CHAPTER 1
1. Nobel Lecture, December 12, 1947, in Frederick W. Haberman, ed., Nobel Lectures, 1926- 1950,vol. 2, Quakers and Peace, pp. 391-98 ( Amsterdam, Elsevier, 1972).
2. Henry J. Cadbury, The Contribution of Negroes to the Education of Friends, Address at the Centennial of the Cheyney Training School for Teachers, Cheyney, Pa., October 16, 1937, Friend 3 ( 12-16- 1937): 220.
3. Talk by Henry J. Cadbury at Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Forum, June 4, 1972, Fifteenth and Cherry Street Meeting House, Henry Joel Cadbury Papers, Quaker Collection, Haverford College Library, Haverford, Pa. (hereafter referred to as Cadbury Papers).
4. Mary Hoxie Jones, "Henry Joel Cadbury: A Biographical Sketch", in Anna Brinton , ed., Then and Now, Quaker Essays: Historical and Contemporary ( Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1960), p. 14.
5. Henry J. Cadbury to John W. Cadbury, 8-2-94, Cadbury Papers.
6. Talk by Henry J. Cadbury at the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Forum.
7. The Heritage of the Meeting House, speech by H. J. Cadbury, 9-29- 1974, Cadbury Papers.

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Let This Life Speak: The Legacy of Henry Joel Cadbury
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Quaker Roots 1
  • Chapter 2 - Teaching and Learning 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Anvil of War 32
  • Chapter 4 - On Quaker Service 50
  • Chapter 5 - The Life of a Scholar 65
  • Chapter 6 - The Beloved Community 79
  • Chapter 7 - A Year Abroad 93
  • Chapter 8 - Conscience in the Classroom 106
  • Chapter 9 - War and Darkness 125
  • Chapter 10 - Translating the New Testament 138
  • Chapter 11 - Defending Our Liberties 157
  • Chapter 12 - An Active Retirement 173
  • Chapter 13 - A Green Old Age 196
  • Chapter 14 - An Appropriate Farewell 213
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography Manuscript Collections 235
  • Index 245
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