A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

Why is it then taught sin or shame,
Those necessary parts to name,
From whence we went, and whence we came?

Nature, what ere she wants, requires; 10
With Love enflaming our desires,
Finds Engines fit to quench those fires:

Death she abhors; yet when men die,
We are present; but no stander by

Looks on when we that loss supply: 15

Forbidden Wares sell twice as dear; Even Sack prohibited last year,
A most abominable rate did bear.

'Tis plain our eyes and ears are nice,

Only to raise by that device, 20
Of those Commodities the price.

Thus Reason's shadows us betray
By Tropes and Figures led astray,
From Nature, both her Guide and way.


EDMUND WALLER
(1606-1645-1687)

To the King on His Navy1

WHERE e're thy Navy spreads her canvas wings,
Homage to thee, and Peace to all she brings.

The French and Spaniard, when thy Flags appear,
Forget their Hatred, and consent to fear.

So Jove from Ida did both Hosts survey, 5

And when he pleas'd to Thunder, part the fray.

Ships heretofore in Seas like Fishes sped,
The mighty still upon the smaller fed.

Thou on the deep imposest Nobler Laws,

And by that Justice hath remov'd the Cause 10
Of those rude Tempests, which for Rapine sent,

____________________
1
Published in Poems, 1645. Text of Poems, &c. Written upon Several Occasions,
5th ed., 1686.

-28-

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