A Collection of English Poems, 1660-1800

By Ronald S. Crane | Go to book overview

THOMAS D'URFEY
( 1653-1678-1723)

Solon's Song1

TANTIVEE, tivee, tivee, tivee, high and low,
Hark, hark, how the merry merry Horn does blow
As through the Lanes and the Meadows we go;
As Puss has run over the Down:

When Ringwood, and Rockwood, and Jowler, and Spring, 3

And Thunder and Wonder made all the Woods ring,
And Horsemen, and Footmen, hey ding, a ding, ding,
Who envies the Splendor and State of a Crown.

Then follow, follow, follow, follow, Jolly Boys,

Keep in with the Beagles now whilst the Scent lies, 10
The fiery-fac'd God is just ready to rise;
Whose Beams all our Pleasure Controuls,
Whilst over the Mountains and Valleys we rowl,
And Watt's fatal knell in each hollow we Toll,
And in the next Cottage top off a brown Bowl, 15
What Pleasure like Hunting can cherish the Soul.


Scotch Song2

JOCKEY was a dowdy Lad;
And Jemmy swarth and tawny:
They, my heart no Captive made,
For that was prize to Sawny.

Jockey wooes, and sighs and sues, 5

And Jemmy offers Money;
Weel, I see, they both love me,
But I love only Sawny.

Jockey high his voice can raise,

And Jemmy tunes the Vyol; 10

But when Sawny Pipes sweet Layes
My heart kens no denyal.

____________________
1
Published in The Marriage-Hater Match'd, 1692, Act II, Scene i. Text of first edition.
2
Published in The Campaigners: or, The Pleasant Adventures as Brussels, 1698, Act III, Scene i. Text of first edition.

-196-

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